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Patriot Games

  by Tom Clancy


(about 798 pages)
199,588
total words
of all the books in our library
34.09%
vividness
of all the books in our library
8.87%
passive voice
of all the books in our library
3.12%
all adverbs
of all the books in our library
1.03%
ly-adverbs
of all the books in our library
2.08%
non-ly-adverbs
of all the books in our library

clippings from this book

We’ve analyzed hundreds of millions of words, from thousands of different authors, training our linguistic models to recognize the most vivid words in the English language… the words that create the most intense sensory experiences: colors, textures, sounds, flavors, and aromas.

Based on our analysis, we’ve scanned through the pages of this book to find the two pages at the extremes, both the most-passive and the most-vivid pages, so that you can compare them side-by-side and see the difference:

MOST PASSIVE PAGE
MOST VIVID PAGE
both. Besides, that’s just TV stuff, shooting a gun out of somebody’s hand. On TV the good guy can do that, but TV isn’t real. With a pistol, you aim for the center of your target. That’s what I did. I stepped out from behind the car to get a clear shot, and I aimed. If McCrory had not turned his gun towards me—I can’t say for sure, but probably I would not have shot. But he did turn and fire, as you can see from my shoulder—and I did return fire. It is true that I might have done things differently. Unfortunately I did not. I had—I didn’t have much time to take action. I did the best I could. I’m sorry the man was killed, but that was his choice, too. He saw I had the drop on him, but he turned and fired—and he fired first, sir.” “But you never said a word, did you?” “No, I don’t think I did,” Jack admitted. “Don’t you wish you’d done things differently?” “Mr. Atkinson, if it makes you feel any better, I have gone over that again and again for the past four weeks. If I’d had more time to think, perhaps I would have done something different. But I’ll never know, because I didn’t have more time.” Jack paused. “I suppose the best thing for all concerned would be if all this had never happened. But I didn’t make it happen, sir. He did lace for a sneaker. He was getting warmer. Several minutes of digging later, he found something close enough. He took one and left the other. After all, shoelaces broke one at a time. Next Jack had to select a tie for the day. That was never easy, though at least he didn’t have his wife around to tell him he’d picked the wrong one. He was wearing a gray suit, and picked a dark blue tie with red stripes. Ryan was still wearing white, button-down shirts made mostly of cotton. Old habits die hard. The suit jacket slid on neatly. It was one of the suits Cathy had bought in England. It was painful to admit that her taste in clothing was far better than his. That London tailor wasn’t too bad, either. He smiled at himself in the mirror—you handsome devil! before heading downstairs. His briefcase was waiting on the foyer table, full of the draft quizzes he’d be giving today. Ryan took his overcoat from the closet, checked to see his keys were in the right pocket, got the briefcase, and went out the door. “Oops!” He unlocked the door and set the burglar alarm before going back outside. Sergeant Major Breckenridge walked down the double line of Marines, and his long-practiced eyes didn’t miss a thing. One private had lint on his blue, high-necked blouse. Another’s shoes needed a little more work, and two needed haircuts; you could barely see their scalps under the quarter-inch hair

emotional story arc

Click anywhere on the chart to see the most significant emotional words — both positive & negative — from the corresponding section of the text…
This chart visualizes the the shifting emotional balance for the arc of this story, based on the emotional strength of the words in the prose, using techniques pioneered by the UVM Computational Story Lab. To create this story arc, we divided the complete manuscript text into 50 equal-sized chunks, each with 3991.76 words, and then we scored each section by counting the number of strongly-emotional words, both positive and negative. The bars in the chart move downward whenever there’s conflict and sadness, and they move upward when conflicts are resolved, or when the characters are happy and content. The size of each bar represents the positive or negative word-count of that section.

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