this is a SHAXPIR project
how does it work?

Gameprey

  by Tom Clancy


(about 272 pages)
68,067
total words
of all the books in our library
49.96%
vividness
of all the books in our library
6.97%
passive voice
of all the books in our library
2.50%
all adverbs
of all the books in our library
1.13%
ly-adverbs
of all the books in our library
1.37%
non-ly-adverbs
of all the books in our library

clippings from this book

We’ve analyzed hundreds of millions of words, from thousands of different authors, training our linguistic models to recognize the most vivid words in the English language… the words that create the most intense sensory experiences: colors, textures, sounds, flavors, and aromas.

Based on our analysis, we’ve scanned through the pages of this book to find the two pages at the extremes, both the most-passive and the most-vivid pages, so that you can compare them side-by-side and see the difference:

MOST PASSIVE PAGE
MOST VIVID PAGE
the horde of Burgundian warriors riding hard for them. “You ready for this?” Matt glanced at Leif, who’d ridden up beside him. “Yeah.” “You don’t have to do this,” Leif said. “After last night, I’d understand.” Matt shook his head, speaking over the rising thunder of the approaching horseshooves. “You know what’s weird?” “What?” “I zipped into Maj’s room in holoform, knowing I couldn’t be hurt, and it was frustrating standing there without being able to do anything. But if I’d been there for real, I don’t know what I’d have done.” “Yeah, you do,” Leif said. “You’d have done what you could. That’s what you’re made of, Matt. Everything in you is bred for the heat of the moment. You’re at your best when the pressure is on, when things are clearest for you.” He grinned laconically. “Most of us are. But don’t second-guess yourself about what you’d have done or not done.” “I keep thinking about it.” “That’s natural. Bet you think a lot about flight-sims you’ve had trouble mastering, too. You’ll get past it.” Matt looked at Andy, who was engaged in animated conversation with Joan of Arc as the skirmish line was set up. The warrior maid organized her warriors, taking advantage of the high ground. Men who still had spears lined up in the forefront. Matt watched the retreating warriors running desperately before their attackers. “We’re not going to win this battle, are we?” “Nope.” Leif grinned. “At least, not if the game is plodded toward the other implant chair in the room. The first implant chair was specially dedicated to Peter Griffen’s systems, hidden so well that Peter had never known he was there. “Hurry,” Heavener commanded. “I am.” Heavener stood in a corner, comfortably wreathed in shadows. She was slender and barely over five feet tall. Her platinum blond hair was cut short and spiky, colored with two distinct red and blue stripes that ran from her left temple to the bottom of her hairline. Silver earring strands glittered, catching the green light from the computer consoles. Her skin was pale, almost to the point of albinism. Contacts covered her eyes, giving them a crescent shape and an amber color that belonged on a hungry cat. She wore tight black leather pants and a black sleeveless top. Her black leather biker’s jacket lay over the back of a nearby chair. Gaspar made himself breathe. When he got really tense around Heavener, he forgot. He settled down in the implant chair, and the interior shrank around his slight form. He was maybe an inch or two taller than Heavener, still a couple inches shy of five and a half feet. His already sallow complexion had turned waxy over the last few months. He normally kept his dark hair razored short, but he hadn’t taken care of it in weeks. Wispy beard stubble tracked his cheeks, only shadowing the acne pits. He triggered the chair’s implants. Then the programming seized his senses and pulled

emotional story arc

Click anywhere on the chart to see the most significant emotional words — both positive & negative — from the corresponding section of the text…
This chart visualizes the the shifting emotional balance for the arc of this story, based on the emotional strength of the words in the prose, using techniques pioneered by the UVM Computational Story Lab. To create this story arc, we divided the complete manuscript text into 50 equal-sized chunks, each with 1361.34 words, and then we scored each section by counting the number of strongly-emotional words, both positive and negative. The bars in the chart move downward whenever there’s conflict and sadness, and they move upward when conflicts are resolved, or when the characters are happy and content. The size of each bar represents the positive or negative word-count of that section.

similar books by different authors

other books by Tom Clancy

something missing?

Our library is always growing, so check back often…

If you’re an author or a publisher,
contact us at submissions@prosecraft.io to help grow the library.