this is a SHAXPIR project
how does it work?

Duel Identity

  by Tom Clancy


(about 219 pages)
54,660
total words
of all the books in our library
48.04%
vividness
of all the books in our library
7.01%
passive voice
of all the books in our library
3.13%
all adverbs
of all the books in our library
1.31%
ly-adverbs
of all the books in our library
1.82%
non-ly-adverbs
of all the books in our library

clippings from this book

We’ve analyzed hundreds of millions of words, from thousands of different authors, training our linguistic models to recognize the most vivid words in the English language… the words that create the most intense sensory experiences: colors, textures, sounds, flavors, and aromas.

Based on our analysis, we’ve scanned through the pages of this book to find the two pages at the extremes, both the most-passive and the most-vivid pages, so that you can compare them side-by-side and see the difference:

MOST PASSIVE PAGE
MOST VIVID PAGE
his hand crunched in his grip. Leif wished it was Andy Moore’s neck. Andy was the only person he knew who would have set up the prank that had humiliated Leif today. Last night, just as Leif had put the finishing touches on his report on Moby Dick, Andy’d paid a virtual visit from Washington, D. C. The boys had hung around in Leif’s virtual workspace, shooting the breeze. Leif had talked about the college-level English course he was taking this summer. And, he remembered, he had mentioned what a babe the instructor was. Krista Mayhew was working on her doctorate at Columbia University, and she made extra money teaching summer sessions at Leif’s school. She was tall, smart, slim, and stunning, with blue eyes, short brunette hair, and an athletic figure. Leif’d had half a crush on her from the moment she’d walked into the classroom. Undoubtedly, he’d been just a bit too fixated on the subject of her appearance as he described her to Andy. The icon representing Leif’s report had been out in the open while he’d blathered away. He’d even saved it to a datascrip while Andy had been there. Man, what had he been thinking? Whatever he’d been thinking, it hadn’t been good enough. He’d handed Andy an opportunity on a plate-and Andy had used it. Leif had no premonition of disaster as he turned in his report to Ms. Mayhew. After all, Moby Dick had been dissected by generations of students. Leif had had when she emerged from the bathroom wrapped in a terrycloth robe. Maybe some foodStanding in the kitchen doorway, she scanned the room in dismay. Obviously her brothers had ravaged through here last night, searching for snacks. The package of English muffins she’d hidden in the cupboard behind a row of soup cans lay empty on the kitchen counter. To add insult to injury, the boys had left the cans out for her to tidy up. Even though she loved her brothers dearly, they made her understand why the phrase “Oh, brother” had come to be used as a universal and everyday curse. Megan went to the stove and began heating a kettle of water. Well, at least Michael, Sean, Paul, and Rory didn’t like tea. She found a scone she’d wrapped in plastic and foil and hidden under the potatoes, put a bag of English Breakfast tea in a cup, and filled it with hot water. While waiting for the tea to steep, Megan unwrapped her scone, cut it in half and toasted it lightly, got out the butter, and found an untouched jar of imported marmalade. The butter melted on the hot, crumbly scone. She could hardly wait to cover it with orange preserves-manna from heaven. Now the tea was ready. Megan spooned in some tur- binado sugar, then went to the refrigerator for milk. There was only a single container there, which contained a tiny dribble of liquid, barely enough to change the color of the tea

emotional story arc

Click anywhere on the chart to see the most significant emotional words — both positive & negative — from the corresponding section of the text…
This chart visualizes the the shifting emotional balance for the arc of this story, based on the emotional strength of the words in the prose, using techniques pioneered by the UVM Computational Story Lab. To create this story arc, we divided the complete manuscript text into 50 equal-sized chunks, each with 1093.20 words, and then we scored each section by counting the number of strongly-emotional words, both positive and negative. The bars in the chart move downward whenever there’s conflict and sadness, and they move upward when conflicts are resolved, or when the characters are happy and content. The size of each bar represents the positive or negative word-count of that section.

similar books by different authors

other books by Tom Clancy

something missing?

Our library is always growing, so check back often…

If you’re an author or a publisher,
contact us at submissions@prosecraft.io to help grow the library.