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Acts Of War

  by Tom Clancy


(about 503 pages)
125,741
total words
of all the books in our library
42.72%
vividness
of all the books in our library
8.14%
passive voice
of all the books in our library
2.55%
all adverbs
of all the books in our library
1.01%
ly-adverbs
of all the books in our library
1.54%
non-ly-adverbs
of all the books in our library

clippings from this book

We’ve analyzed hundreds of millions of words, from thousands of different authors, training our linguistic models to recognize the most vivid words in the English language… the words that create the most intense sensory experiences: colors, textures, sounds, flavors, and aromas.

Based on our analysis, we’ve scanned through the pages of this book to find the two pages at the extremes, both the most-passive and the most-vivid pages, so that you can compare them side-by-side and see the difference:

MOST PASSIVE PAGE
MOST VIVID PAGE
I’m totally confused,” Martha said impatiently. “First, who do they think was shot and why?” “They don’t know,” Herbert said. He shut his eyes. “I don’t know. I’ve got to think. Why would the ROC take off? Because they were afraid someone heard the gunshot? That’s possible. That isn’t what’s important. The question is, who was shot? If one of the hostages had been killed, the Syrians probably would have dumped the body behind.” “And if they were wounded?” Martha asked. “Unlikely,” Herbert said. “How can you be sure?” “The Turks say the shot echoed,” Herbert said. “The ROC is soundproofed. It would have swallowed most of the blast. In order to be wounded, a hostage probably would have been trying to run away in the dark. The gun would have fired, the hostage would have fallen, and the ROC would have driven to where he or she was. It didn’t. It was right by the fence. No,” Herbert said. “I know Mike Rodgers. My guess is that they were about to cross into Syria, so he decided to try and stop them.” “And failed,” she stated flatly. Herbert fired her a look. “Don’t say it like he screwed up. The fact that he or someone else may have made the effort at all is a helluva thing. A helluva big thing.” “I didn’t mean any disrespect,” she said indignantly. “Yeah, well, it sounded like that.” “Calm down, Bob,” Martha said. “I’m sorry.” “Sure,” he said. “The sideline generals are Bekaa, and he found an olive grove well away from the dirt road. Covered with fallen leaves for warmth and concealment, Falah had the Lebanese Mountains to the west and the foothills of the Anti-Lebanon range to the east. He made certain there was a break in the peaks where he rested. That would allow the rising sun to kiss him before it cleared the mountains and woke others in the valley. Virtually every village in Syria and Lebanon has its own preferred style of dress and cloth. Wraps, robes, trousers, and skirts with distinctive patterns, colors, tassels, and accoutrements are more varied here than anywhere in the world. Some of the styles are based on tradition, others are based on function. Among the Kurds who had moved into the southern Bekaa, the only traditional article of clothing is the headdress. Before leaving Tel Nef, Falah had gone into the “closet,” a well-stocked wardrobe room, to dress for his role as an itinerant farm worker. He’d selected a ratty black robe, black sandals, and a characteristic black, stiff, tasseled headdress. He’d also chosen heavy, black-framed sunglasses. Under the torn, loose-fitting robe, Falah wore a tight rubber belt strapped to his waist. Two waterproof pouches were attached to it. One, on his right hip, contained a fake Turkish passport with a Kurdish name and an address in a Kurdish village. He was Aram Tunas from Semdinli. The pouch also contained a small two-way radio. The other pouch contained a. Magnum revolver

emotional story arc

Click anywhere on the chart to see the most significant emotional words — both positive & negative — from the corresponding section of the text…
This chart visualizes the the shifting emotional balance for the arc of this story, based on the emotional strength of the words in the prose, using techniques pioneered by the UVM Computational Story Lab. To create this story arc, we divided the complete manuscript text into 50 equal-sized chunks, each with 2514.82 words, and then we scored each section by counting the number of strongly-emotional words, both positive and negative. The bars in the chart move downward whenever there’s conflict and sadness, and they move upward when conflicts are resolved, or when the characters are happy and content. The size of each bar represents the positive or negative word-count of that section.

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