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Red Corona

  by Tim Glister


(about 324 pages)
81,028
total words
of all the books in our library
43.18%
vividness
of all the books in our library
8.10%
passive voice
of all the books in our library
2.92%
all adverbs
of all the books in our library
1.00%
ly-adverbs
of all the books in our library
1.92%
non-ly-adverbs
of all the books in our library

clippings from this book

We’ve analyzed hundreds of millions of words, from thousands of different authors, training our linguistic models to recognize the most vivid words in the English language… the words that create the most intense sensory experiences: colors, textures, sounds, flavors, and aromas.

Based on our analysis, we’ve scanned through the pages of this book to find the two pages at the extremes, both the most-passive and the most-vivid pages, so that you can compare them side-by-side and see the difference:

MOST PASSIVE PAGE
MOST VIVID PAGE
thinks there’s a wolf in your henhouse.’ ‘There’s no proof MI5 has been compromised.’ Knox was aware he sounded like Peterson when he’d voiced the exact same idea to him outside the Fountain. ‘Well you sure are acting like there is, and here’s the evidence,’ Bennett said, pointing at the photo of Valera. ‘That’s a big leap,’ he said, covering his relief with another swig of coffee. ‘This is a big problem.’ She wasn’t smirking any more. ‘We were watching Bianchi and Moretti too. They were murdered, and now there’s a Russian genius in the same field suddenly in play. There’s no way they aren’t connected.’ Bennett had made the link herself the night before. It was what made her finally decide it was time to talk to Knox. ‘And, for argument’s sake,’ Knox replied, ‘so what if they are?’ ‘We’re peering through the keyhole of a door that’s about to be thrown open. Whoever is at the front of this technology will have the power to spy on anyone, anywhere, any time.’ ‘Big Brother isn’t real,’ Knox said. ‘Not yet he isn’t,’ Bennett replied. ‘But one day he will be. If we’re lucky it’ll be a friendly face watching over us. But what if it isn’t? Living under constant surveillance. No more privacy. Never knowing who we could trust.’ If Knox had any other job, he’d think she was crazy. But he was a spy, and as alarmist as he thought Bennett was being, he knew what she was felt a familiar pang in her stomach and opened the fridge. Astonishingly, it wasn’t empty. On the middle shelf was a small plate of sandwiches, half a loaf of bread, and a jar of jam. Valera inspected and then discarded the bread and sandwiches. She didn’t trust them – the bread was too white and neat, the sandwiches filled with some kind of square-cut, processed meat. But she couldn’t resist the jam jar. She picked it up, unscrewed the lid, and inhaled the rich, cloying smell of sugar and berries. Her sense of smell was dulled from the burning embers she’d breathed in as she’d searched the ruins of Ledjo’s school but the pungent aroma was still almost enough to overwhelm her. Then she scooped a handful of the cold, sticky substance into her mouth. The slick feeling on her tongue took Valera instantly back to her first spring in Povenets B, when the sun was starting to get hot and the days were getting longer. She had sat on the scrub in front of her bungalow, smearing jam made from Zukolev’s private supply of raspberries that she’d kept over winter onto chunks of rye bread as Ledjo showed off his Young Pioneers neckerchief, which Valera had made for him the night before. He’d marched up and down as Valera clapped and laughed, chanting the Young Pioneers’ motto, ‘Be prepared!’ over and over between bites of jam and bread. Valera kept scooping jam into her mouth until the jar was empty

emotional story arc

Click anywhere on the chart to see the most significant emotional words — both positive & negative — from the corresponding section of the text…
This chart visualizes the the shifting emotional balance for the arc of this story, based on the emotional strength of the words in the prose, using techniques pioneered by the UVM Computational Story Lab. To create this story arc, we divided the complete manuscript text into 50 equal-sized chunks, each with 1620.56 words, and then we scored each section by counting the number of strongly-emotional words, both positive and negative. The bars in the chart move downward whenever there’s conflict and sadness, and they move upward when conflicts are resolved, or when the characters are happy and content. The size of each bar represents the positive or negative word-count of that section.

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