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The Russia Account

  by Stephen Coonts


(about 381 pages)
95,328
total words
of all the books in our library
37.76%
vividness
of all the books in our library
8.01%
passive voice
of all the books in our library
2.43%
all adverbs
of all the books in our library
0.77%
ly-adverbs
of all the books in our library
1.66%
non-ly-adverbs
of all the books in our library

clippings from this book

We’ve analyzed hundreds of millions of words, from thousands of different authors, training our linguistic models to recognize the most vivid words in the English language… the words that create the most intense sensory experiences: colors, textures, sounds, flavors, and aromas.

Based on our analysis, we’ve scanned through the pages of this book to find the two pages at the extremes, both the most-passive and the most-vivid pages, so that you can compare them side-by-side and see the difference:

MOST PASSIVE PAGE
MOST VIVID PAGE
to do it while that yacht is there in the harbor?” “I want to do it as quickly as possible, wherever it is.” “If it’s underway, we have more options. Just anchored there…” “Do you have anyone to help us?” I asked hopefully. “Four guys and some equipment. They are coming in tonight on a small yacht that will tie up to the quay if there’s room, anchor if there isn’t.” So wheels were turning. “Where did you get your equipment?” One doesn’t carry wet suits, scuba gear, weapons, and explosives through Italian customs. “The yacht rendezvoused with a Navy LHD last night. USS Hornet. Man, we’re ready for whatever.” “Let’s talk how you want to do it,” I said. “Do you care if they later learn you’ve been there?” “No. They know the shit has hit the fan.” “That will make it easier.” He grinned, showing white, even teeth. “This is gonna be fun.” “We’ll see.” I had this sneaking suspicion that this SEAL’s idea of fun and mine were two entirely different things. Sarah Houston reported to Jake Grafton in his office. “We’ve made a little progress, but not much. It will take years to follow the money trail if we can get into bank records, which will be very difficult. If they catch us at it…” Grafton nodded. Sometimes you have to accept an expert’s opinion, even if it isn’t what you want to hear. “We’ll have to leave it to the FBI. I expect we’ll be it gets to be a habit. The little village in the harbor of Capri came into view, picturesque with the big mountain behind it. As soon as the ferry entered the old harbor, I saw Catherine the Great anchored on one side of the roadstead. I looked her over as we slid by. The helicopter was on the helo-pad, chained down. People in uniform were on deck doing sailor things, and a couple of voluptuous young women in bikinis were strolling near the rail, showing off their assets. They were tan and gorgeous. Apparently Yegan Korjev liked some light diversions in the evening—perhaps in the morning and afternoon, too. I watched the ferry dock and joined the crowd going ashore. Pulling my little wheeled carry-on, I wandered along the quay taking in the scene. There were boats of every size and description, yachts moored stern-first to the quay, the so-called Mediterranean moor, and a holiday crowd, even though this was the end of the weekend. Some of the boats looked like they belonged to working fishermen, getting fresh fish ready for the restaurants. The thought occurred to me that dinner would be nice, so as the shadows lengthened, I entered a sidewalk café and scored a seat on the sidewalk at a little table. I ordered a local red wine and a fish dinner. The scene looked like something from a post card: splotches of blues, yellows, and reds, the little cafés, the picturesque quay. I had to pinch

emotional story arc

Click anywhere on the chart to see the most significant emotional words — both positive & negative — from the corresponding section of the text…
This chart visualizes the the shifting emotional balance for the arc of this story, based on the emotional strength of the words in the prose, using techniques pioneered by the UVM Computational Story Lab. To create this story arc, we divided the complete manuscript text into 50 equal-sized chunks, each with 1906.56 words, and then we scored each section by counting the number of strongly-emotional words, both positive and negative. The bars in the chart move downward whenever there’s conflict and sadness, and they move upward when conflicts are resolved, or when the characters are happy and content. The size of each bar represents the positive or negative word-count of that section.

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