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Enemies of Doves

  by Shanessa Gluhm


(about 455 pages)
113,714
total words
of all the books in our library
47.40%
vividness
of all the books in our library
9.34%
passive voice
of all the books in our library
2.70%
all adverbs
of all the books in our library
0.57%
ly-adverbs
of all the books in our library
2.13%
non-ly-adverbs
of all the books in our library

clippings from this book

We’ve analyzed hundreds of millions of words, from thousands of different authors, training our linguistic models to recognize the most vivid words in the English language… the words that create the most intense sensory experiences: colors, textures, sounds, flavors, and aromas.

Based on our analysis, we’ve scanned through the pages of this book to find the two pages at the extremes, both the most-passive and the most-vivid pages, so that you can compare them side-by-side and see the difference:

MOST PASSIVE PAGE
MOST VIVID PAGE
events obviously unearthed an old hurt. “You’re right. And I have no right to be angry about that.” “Yes, you do. I’m sorry. That’s not the kind of person I —” “But I do have the right to be angry about this.” Lorraine let her head fall into her hands. “What are we going to do, Joel?” “Maybe Doc Banks can give him something to steady his nerves. We don’t have to figure it out tonight. It’s 2:00 AM.” “Is it?” She jumped up. “I need to leave.” “You don’t have to.” “We need to get some sleep.” Joel pushed his hands into his pockets. “We were.” “Don’t read something into that, Joel.” Lorraine shook dirt from the blanket. “I was upset and tired. It wasn’t like—” “I’m fully aware of what it wasn’t. But it was nice.” It had been nice. Lorraine missed the comfort only Joel gave her. Would she still be missing it had Clancy come home complete? He’d brought comfort once, hadn’t he? Did the war render him incapable now or had he never made her feel what Joel did? It was hard to be certain. Young lovers only wore rose-tinted glasses or even blindfolds, never bifocals. All she was sure of was that Joel hadn’t changed. He was still a rock. A rock for Clancy and for her. What if Clancy never snapped out of this battle fatigue? Would she always wake up to screams, or worse, his hands around her throat? It would be to a white world: white walls, white sheets, a white pitcher of water, and a stranger wearing white. White like Mama’s favorite flowers, white like the coat Daddy wore to work, white like the doves that… No, don’t think about doves. Don’t think about doves ever again. The white was better than his last memory: black. Ravenous black. It had swallowed everything. Harsh light speared into the room, painting sharp rectangles on the linoleum floor. Joel blinked involuntarily. The lady in the white uniform noticed. “He’s awake!” she called. “Mrs. Fitchett, he’s awake!” Mama and Daddy charged in, talking at the same time, asking the same questions. “I’m okay,” Joel said. Mama’s hands hovered a few seconds before settling on his arm. “I’m sorry we weren’t here. I told your daddy we shouldn’t both leave but—” “Are you in pain, son?” Daddy rarely let Mama finish a sentence. “My stomach hurts.” Joel didn’t recognize the sound of his own voice, so small and croaky. “Nurse! Bring this boy something for the pain,” Daddy yelled. “A magnesia tablet.” Mama put her freezing hand on his forehead. “He might have a fever too.” The nurse let out a noisy breath. She didn’t bother with his temperature, but the two bone-white pills she handed Joel appeased his parents, got them quiet at least. Joel raised his head, sweat-soaked hair sticking to his forehead. Or was it blood? He touched the bandage covering his face and winced. The details of the night before seeped

emotional story arc

Click anywhere on the chart to see the most significant emotional words — both positive & negative — from the corresponding section of the text…
This chart visualizes the the shifting emotional balance for the arc of this story, based on the emotional strength of the words in the prose, using techniques pioneered by the UVM Computational Story Lab. To create this story arc, we divided the complete manuscript text into 50 equal-sized chunks, each with 2274.28 words, and then we scored each section by counting the number of strongly-emotional words, both positive and negative. The bars in the chart move downward whenever there’s conflict and sadness, and they move upward when conflicts are resolved, or when the characters are happy and content. The size of each bar represents the positive or negative word-count of that section.

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