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Trevayne

  by Robert Ludlum


(about 587 pages)
146,703
total words
of all the books in our library
30.08%
vividness
of all the books in our library
9.41%
passive voice
of all the books in our library
2.94%
all adverbs
of all the books in our library
1.35%
ly-adverbs
of all the books in our library
1.59%
non-ly-adverbs
of all the books in our library

clippings from this book

We’ve analyzed hundreds of millions of words, from thousands of different authors, training our linguistic models to recognize the most vivid words in the English language… the words that create the most intense sensory experiences: colors, textures, sounds, flavors, and aromas.

Based on our analysis, we’ve scanned through the pages of this book to find the two pages at the extremes, both the most-passive and the most-vivid pages, so that you can compare them side-by-side and see the difference:

MOST PASSIVE PAGE
MOST VIVID PAGE
what this is all about? You don’t believe there’s any connection between that heroin and those girls any more than I do.” “Why don’t I? It’s a very expensive connection.” “Because if you did, you’d have them down here and booked. Precisely because it is expensive. You’re handling the entire situation in a very unorthodox manner. “Yes, I am.” Fowler walked around his desk and sat down. “And you’re right, I don’t believe there’s a connection. On the other hand, I can’t dismiss it. Circumstantially, it’s explosive; I don’t have to tell you that.” “What are you going to do?” “This’ll surprise you, but I may be guided by your attorney.” “Which reinforces my statement.” “Yes, it does. I don’t think we’re on opposite sides, but I’ve got problems. We’ve got the evidence; I certainly can’t ignore it. On the other hand, the manner of our getting it raises questions. I can’t legally hang it on the kids-not considering everything… “ “I’d have you in court on false arrest. That could be expensive.” “Oh, come on, Mr. Trevayne. Don’t threaten. Legally, those girls, including your daughter, admitted using marijuana. That’s against the law. But it’s minor, and we wouldn’t press it. The other is something else. Greenwich doesn’t want that kind of publicity; and a quarter of a million dollars’ worth of uncut heroin is a lot of publicity. We don’t want a Darien here.” Trevayne saw that Fowler was sincere. It was a problem. It was also insane. Why would the back lawn. On the wall 290 Robert Ludlum by the door were several ornate coat hooks, a woolen muffler hanging from one of them. He reached for it and wrapped it around his neck. “I am an old woman; I need my shawl. You are young; the cold air will be invigorating. The snow beneath your feet won’t hurt good leather. I know. When I was a child in the Stuttgart winters, my shoe leather was ersatz. My feet were always cold.” He opened the door and led Trevayne out on the snow-covered grass. They walked to the far end of the lawn, past burlap-covered bushes and a marble table which stood in front of a white latticed arbor. Summer tea, thought Trevayne. They went just beyond the arbor to the edge of a tall Japanese maple and turned right. This section of the lawn was narrow, bordered by the maple and a row of evergreens on the other side. It was actually a wide path. The flickering immediately caught Trevayne’s eye. At the end of the wooded corridor was a bronze Star of David raised perhaps a foot above the ground. It measured no larger than twenty or twenty-five inches, and on each side there was a small recessed casing in which a flame burned steadily. It was like a miniature altar protected by fire, the two jets of flame somehow strong and fierce. And very sad. “No tears, Mr. Trevayne. No wringing of hands or mournful wails

emotional story arc

Click anywhere on the chart to see the most significant emotional words — both positive & negative — from the corresponding section of the text…
This chart visualizes the the shifting emotional balance for the arc of this story, based on the emotional strength of the words in the prose, using techniques pioneered by the UVM Computational Story Lab. To create this story arc, we divided the complete manuscript text into 50 equal-sized chunks, each with 2934.06 words, and then we scored each section by counting the number of strongly-emotional words, both positive and negative. The bars in the chart move downward whenever there’s conflict and sadness, and they move upward when conflicts are resolved, or when the characters are happy and content. The size of each bar represents the positive or negative word-count of that section.

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