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The Scarletti Inheritance

  by Robert Ludlum


(about 407 pages)
101,718
total words
of all the books in our library
32.59%
vividness
of all the books in our library
9.27%
passive voice
of all the books in our library
2.91%
all adverbs
of all the books in our library
1.30%
ly-adverbs
of all the books in our library
1.61%
non-ly-adverbs
of all the books in our library

clippings from this book

We’ve analyzed hundreds of millions of words, from thousands of different authors, training our linguistic models to recognize the most vivid words in the English language… the words that create the most intense sensory experiences: colors, textures, sounds, flavors, and aromas.

Based on our analysis, we’ve scanned through the pages of this book to find the two pages at the extremes, both the most-passive and the most-vivid pages, so that you can compare them side-by-side and see the difference:

MOST PASSIVE PAGE
MOST VIVID PAGE
didn’t know you.’ ‘Do I really have to see him? Talk to him?’ ‘I’ll be in the room with you. That’s where the deal is made.’ Andrew Scarlett looked startled. ‘Then you’re going to make a deal with him.’ It was a distasteful statement of fact. ‘We have to know what he can deliver. Once he’s satisfied that I’ve carried out my end of the bargain, you, we’ll know what it is he’s offering. And for what.’ ‘Then I don’t have to read this, do I.’ It was not a question. ‘All I have to do is be there—Okay, I’ll be there!’ ‘You’ll read it because I’m ordering you to!’ ‘All right. All right, Dad. I’ll read it.’ ‘Thank you. I’m sorry I had to speak that way.’ He began to button his overcoat. ‘Sure… I deserved it… By the way, suppose Mother decides to call me at school? She does, you know.’ ‘There’s a tap on your phone as of this morning. An intercept, to be exact. Works fine. You have a new friend named Tom Ahrens.’ ‘Who’s he?’ ‘A lieutenant in CIC. Stationed in Boston. He has your schedule and will cover the phone. He knows what to say. You went to Smith for a long weekend.’ ‘Jesus, you think of everything.’ ‘Most of the time.’ Canfield had reached the door. ‘I may not be back tonight.’ ‘Where are you going?’ ‘I’ve got some work to do. I’d rather you didn’t go out but if you do room. Expensive oriental throw rugs were placed on the parquet floors… This was all as it should be. However, what shocked the field accountant was the color scheme of the hallway itself. The wallpaper was a richtoo richred damask, and the drapes covering the french doors were black—a heavy black velvet that was out of character with the ornate delicacy of the French furniture. Janet Scarlett noticed his reaction to the colors and before Canfield could disguise it, said, ‘Rather hits you in the eye, doesn’t it?’ ‘I hadn’t noticed,’ he said politely. ‘My husband insisted on that hideous red and then replaced all my pink silks with those awful black drapes. He made a terrible scene about it when I objected.’ She parted the double doors and moved into the darkness to turn on a table lamp. Canfield followed her into the extraordinarily ornate living room. It was the size of five squash courts, and the number of settees, sofas, and armchairs was staggering. Fringed lamps were silhouetted atop numerous tables placed conveniently by the seating places. The arrangement of the furniture was unrelated except for a semicircle of divans facing an enormous fireplace. In the dim light of the single lamp, Canfield’s eyes were immediately drawn to a panoply of dull reflections above the mantel. They were photographs. Dozens of photographs of varying sizes placed in thin black frames. They were arranged as a floral spray, the focal point being a scroll encased in gold

emotional story arc

Click anywhere on the chart to see the most significant emotional words — both positive & negative — from the corresponding section of the text…
This chart visualizes the the shifting emotional balance for the arc of this story, based on the emotional strength of the words in the prose, using techniques pioneered by the UVM Computational Story Lab. To create this story arc, we divided the complete manuscript text into 50 equal-sized chunks, each with 2034.36 words, and then we scored each section by counting the number of strongly-emotional words, both positive and negative. The bars in the chart move downward whenever there’s conflict and sadness, and they move upward when conflicts are resolved, or when the characters are happy and content. The size of each bar represents the positive or negative word-count of that section.

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