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The Rhineman Exchange

  by Robert Ludlum


(about 562 pages)
140,554
total words
of all the books in our library
40.86%
vividness
of all the books in our library
8.79%
passive voice
of all the books in our library
2.82%
all adverbs
of all the books in our library
1.31%
ly-adverbs
of all the books in our library
1.51%
non-ly-adverbs
of all the books in our library

clippings from this book

We’ve analyzed hundreds of millions of words, from thousands of different authors, training our linguistic models to recognize the most vivid words in the English language… the words that create the most intense sensory experiences: colors, textures, sounds, flavors, and aromas.

Based on our analysis, we’ve scanned through the pages of this book to find the two pages at the extremes, both the most-passive and the most-vivid pages, so that you can compare them side-by-side and see the difference:

MOST PASSIVE PAGE
MOST VIVID PAGE
might have been related to Buenos Aires. I didn’t say it was, I said it might have been.’ ‘That’s not possible!’ ‘How the hell can you be so sureT ‘Because I am.’ Kendall was not only agitated, thought David, he was impatient. ‘This is a business proposition. The deal’s been made. There’s no one trying to stop it. Stop us.’ ‘Hostilities don’t cease because a deal’s been made. if the German command got wind of it they’d blow up Buenos Aires to stop it.’ ‘Yeah… well, that’s not possible.’ ‘You know that?’ ‘We know it… So don’t go confusing that stupid bastard, Swanson. I’ll level with you. This is strictly a money-line negotiation. We could have completed it without any help from Washington, but they insisted - Swanson insisted - that they have a man here. O.K., you’re him. You can be helpful; you can get the papers out and you speak the languages. But that’s all you’ve got to do. Don’t call attention to yourself. We don’t want anyone upset.’ Grudgingly, David began to understand the subtle clarity of Brigadier General Swanson’s manipulation. Swanson had maneuvered him into a clean position. The killing of Erich Rhinemann -whether he did it himself or whether he bought the assassin - would be totally unexpected. Swanson wasn’t by any means the ‘stupid bastard’ Kendall thought he was. Or that David had considered. Swanson was nervous. A neophyte. But he was pretty damned good. ‘All right. My apologies,’said Spaulding, indicating a sincerity he didn’t underneath the grotesque yet beautiful chandelier, past the marble staircase to an archway at, the end of the great hall. It led out to an enormous terrace that stretched the length of the building. There were white wrought-iron tables topped with spotless glass, chairs of varying sizes with brightly colored cushions. A series of large double doors could be seen on both sides of the arch; they presumably led to diverse sections of the huge house. Bordering the terrace was a stone balustrade, waist high, with statuary and plants on the railing. Beyond the balcony, in the distance, were the waters of the Rio LujAn. At the left end of the terrace was a small platform, blocked by a gate. Enormously thick wires could be seen above. It was a dock for a cable car, the wires evidently “tending down to the river. David absorbed the splendor, expecting his first view of Rhinemarm. There was no one; he walked to the railing and saw that beneath the balcony was another terrace perhaps twenty feet below. A large swimming pool - complete with racing lines in the tile - was illuminated by floodlights under the blue green water. Additional metal tables with sun umbrellas and deck chairs were dotted about the pool and the terrace. And surrounding it all was a manicured lawn that in the various reflections of light looked like the thickest, fullest putting green David had ever seen. Somewhat incongruously, there were the silhouettes of poles and wickets; a croquet

emotional story arc

Click anywhere on the chart to see the most significant emotional words — both positive & negative — from the corresponding section of the text…
This chart visualizes the the shifting emotional balance for the arc of this story, based on the emotional strength of the words in the prose, using techniques pioneered by the UVM Computational Story Lab. To create this story arc, we divided the complete manuscript text into 50 equal-sized chunks, each with 2811.08 words, and then we scored each section by counting the number of strongly-emotional words, both positive and negative. The bars in the chart move downward whenever there’s conflict and sadness, and they move upward when conflicts are resolved, or when the characters are happy and content. The size of each bar represents the positive or negative word-count of that section.

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