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The Parsifal Mosaic

  by Robert Ludlum


(about 165 pages)
41,195
total words
of all the books in our library
38.32%
vividness
of all the books in our library
8.23%
passive voice
of all the books in our library
2.86%
all adverbs
of all the books in our library
1.25%
ly-adverbs
of all the books in our library
1.61%
non-ly-adverbs
of all the books in our library

clippings from this book

We’ve analyzed hundreds of millions of words, from thousands of different authors, training our linguistic models to recognize the most vivid words in the English language… the words that create the most intense sensory experiences: colors, textures, sounds, flavors, and aromas.

Based on our analysis, we’ve scanned through the pages of this book to find the two pages at the extremes, both the most-passive and the most-vivid pages, so that you can compare them side-by-side and see the difference:

MOST PASSIVE PAGE
MOST VIVID PAGE
was dead-for some part of love was a part of whatever they were. He had done what he had to do, just as she bad done the same. Each was right, each wrong, ultimately so terribly wrong. He closed his eyes, feeling the unwanted dampness. Why did it have to be? We are fools. Worse, we are stu- 8 RoBLmT LuDLUM pid. We do not talk; we die. So men with fluld tongues and facile minds can tell us what is right and wrong-geopolitically, you understand, which means that whatever they say is beyond our puerile understanding. What will you do, MikhailP Teach, I suppose. At a college somewhere What will you teach? History… It was all history now. Remembrances of things too painful. Let it be cold history, as the early days were history. They cannot be a part of me any longer. She cannot be a part of me, it she ever was, even in her pretense. Yet I will keep a promise, not to her but to myself. I am finished. I will disappear into another lite, a new lite. I will go somewhere, teach somewhere. Illuminate the lessons of futility. He heard the voices and opened his eyes. Below, the killers of the Baader-Meinhof had reached the condemned woman, sprawled out in death, clutching the ground that was her execution place-geopolitically preordained. Had she really been so magnificent a liar? Yes, she had been, for he had seen the truth. Even in her eyes he had sprays of white where isolated waves crashed into the rocks of the shoreline. The stretch of beach between the towering boulders of the Costa Brava was the execution ground. It had to be. May God damn this goddamned world-it had to bel He could see her now. And hear her through the sounds of the sea and the breaking surf. She was running wildly, screaming hysterically: “Pro boha iiv6hol ProN Co to d6WI Pfestafil ProN ProN Her blond hair was caught in the moonlight, her racing silhouette given substance by the beam of a powerful flashlight fifty yards behind her. She fell; the gap closed and a staccato burst of gunfire abruptly, insolently split the night air, bullets exploding the sand and the wild grass all around her. She would be dead in a matter of seconds. His love would be gone. They were high on the hill overlooking the Moldau, the boats on the -river plowing the waters north and south, their wakes furrows. 4RoBERT LUDLUM winds above Prague would come along and blow th. smoke away so the mountains could be seen again. His head was on Jenna’s lap, his long legs stretched out, touching the wicker basket she had packed with sandwiches and iced wine. She sat on the grass, her back against the smooth bark of a birch tree, she stroked his hair, her fingers circling his face, gently outlining his lips and cheekbones. ‘Mikhail, my darling, I was thinking. Those tweed jackets and dark trousers

emotional story arc

Click anywhere on the chart to see the most significant emotional words — both positive & negative — from the corresponding section of the text…
This chart visualizes the the shifting emotional balance for the arc of this story, based on the emotional strength of the words in the prose, using techniques pioneered by the UVM Computational Story Lab. To create this story arc, we divided the complete manuscript text into 50 equal-sized chunks, each with 823.90 words, and then we scored each section by counting the number of strongly-emotional words, both positive and negative. The bars in the chart move downward whenever there’s conflict and sadness, and they move upward when conflicts are resolved, or when the characters are happy and content. The size of each bar represents the positive or negative word-count of that section.

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