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Assassins Rogue

  by Rachel Amphlett


(about 248 pages)
61,923
total words
of all the books in our library
48.69%
vividness
of all the books in our library
6.86%
passive voice
of all the books in our library
2.25%
all adverbs
of all the books in our library
0.34%
ly-adverbs
of all the books in our library
1.91%
non-ly-adverbs
of all the books in our library

clippings from this book

We’ve analyzed hundreds of millions of words, from thousands of different authors, training our linguistic models to recognize the most vivid words in the English language… the words that create the most intense sensory experiences: colors, textures, sounds, flavors, and aromas.

Based on our analysis, we’ve scanned through the pages of this book to find the two pages at the extremes, both the most-passive and the most-vivid pages, so that you can compare them side-by-side and see the difference:

MOST PASSIVE PAGE
MOST VIVID PAGE
that’s it.’ ‘What?’ ‘What if this Colonel – whoever he is – managed to salvage a drone that had been written off?’ ‘Don’t those have to be accounted for?’ He managed a smile. ‘Not if whoever lost it is embarrassed – or lost it while they were flying somewhere they shouldn’t have been.’ ‘If someone’s got control of a Reaper, then they’d do anything to keep it a secret, won’t they? Especially if it’s been used to murder a British diplomat.’ Eva stalked the cheap linoleum floor, her thoughts in turmoil. ‘If we’re right and it has been stolen, at least that goes some way to explain why Kelly’s co-pilot was shot trying to escape, and why she’s being hunted,’ said Nathan. ‘Do you think she’s telling the truth?’ ‘Yes.’ ‘You seem certain.’ He didn’t answer. Eva checked her watch, then crossed to the table and picked up the 9mm pistol, handing it to Nathan. ‘Take this. We’ll ask Novotný to get Kelly stabilised, and then we’ll get out of here the minute Marie turns up. If she does…’ ‘She will.’ ‘I’ll make another phone call to see if Decker might know somewhere we can stay, or––’ Movement on the laptop screen caught her eye. ‘Novotný’s at the end of the next street. I’ll go and intercept him to make sure he isn’t being followed. You’d better check on Kelly – we’ve been up here too long as it is.’ ‘Eva?’ She shook her head and turned. ‘We’ll talk about this later.’ ‘We have suite sink, he padded into the bedroom and blinked in the cool sunlight beginning to stream through the floor-to-ceiling window at the far end. Beyond the net curtain, a small balcony hung over secluded gardens surrounded by tall poplar trees. A squirrel bounded across the lawn, scampered past the children’s croquet set and shot up a trellis beside a bird bath. ‘Do you want another coffee?’ God, yes. ‘Please, love.’ ‘Up there?’ ‘I’ll be down in a second.’ Reaching down to loosen his belt buckle a notch, Robert crossed to the wardrobe and pulled a dark grey jacket from a hanger before lacing up his shoes and heading downstairs. Deborah stood at the granite worktop next to the toaster, a glass of orange juice in her hand. She cocked an eyebrow when she saw him and turned down the volume on the digital radio. ‘Best tell them you think you’re coming down with a cold.’ ‘It could be.’ He shot her a wan smile, placed the jacket on the back of one of the bar stools surrounding the central worktop and sank into one next to it. ‘Plenty of water this morningyou’ll feel fine by noon.’ She pushed a steaming mug of coffee towards him, along with a plate on which two slices of marmalade-laden toast sat. ‘What time’s your meeting with the PM?’ ‘Ten.’ ‘Ah.’ ‘Indeed.’ He took a sip of coffee, relishing the bitter taste that mingled with a satisfying sugar hit that smacked his back teeth

emotional story arc

Click anywhere on the chart to see the most significant emotional words — both positive & negative — from the corresponding section of the text…
This chart visualizes the the shifting emotional balance for the arc of this story, based on the emotional strength of the words in the prose, using techniques pioneered by the UVM Computational Story Lab. To create this story arc, we divided the complete manuscript text into 50 equal-sized chunks, each with 1238.46 words, and then we scored each section by counting the number of strongly-emotional words, both positive and negative. The bars in the chart move downward whenever there’s conflict and sadness, and they move upward when conflicts are resolved, or when the characters are happy and content. The size of each bar represents the positive or negative word-count of that section.

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