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One Minute Out

  by Mark Greaney


(about 640 pages)
160,117
total words
of all the books in our library
38.40%
vividness
of all the books in our library
7.83%
passive voice
of all the books in our library
3.05%
all adverbs
of all the books in our library
0.85%
ly-adverbs
of all the books in our library
2.20%
non-ly-adverbs
of all the books in our library

clippings from this book

We’ve analyzed hundreds of millions of words, from thousands of different authors, training our linguistic models to recognize the most vivid words in the English language… the words that create the most intense sensory experiences: colors, textures, sounds, flavors, and aromas.

Based on our analysis, we’ve scanned through the pages of this book to find the two pages at the extremes, both the most-passive and the most-vivid pages, so that you can compare them side-by-side and see the difference:

MOST PASSIVE PAGE
MOST VIVID PAGE
the bathrobe.’ But no, I didn’t talk to her.” Verdoorn sniffs out a laugh. I wait to hear whatever his pitch is. He says, “You’re good, mate. You know you are good.” “And you’re bad. You know that, too, right?” “Guilty as charged. But me and my boys will be around Roxana from here on out, and we can’t wait for you to come and try again.” I find this intriguing. “So… you aren’t warning me to back off, you’re hoping I’ll keep coming.” “That’s it. I guess you are used to scaring your enemy so bad they don’t put up a fight.” I’m hardly used to that, but far be it from me to dissuade him from thinking I’m a badass. He keeps talking. “Gentry, I’m not like your average bloke. I’m bladdy looking forward to the day we meet.” “Me, too. Why don’t you give me your address? I’ll pop right over.” “No such luck. Can’t make it too easy, can I? The boss man wouldn’t be happy with me. Nah, mate, I’ll just do what I do, work within the confines of my job. I’ll let Roxana do what she does, or what she’ll be forced to do soon enough, which won’t be pretty. I’ll just wait for the stars to align and for you to show up in front of me.” “Hey,” I say. “While I’ve got you, what’s it like knowing you are ruining the lives of tens of thousands of innocent girls? How does cigarette butts and soiled sheets. What looks like dried blood stains the walls. Shit. Someone has been living in these horrible dark conditions, a prisoner here, no doubt, but I don’t take the time to dig into how long ago they vacated. I’m here for the general; thinking about anything else right now is just going to get in the way. There are a tiny washbasin and a toilet in a small room beyond, but the area is clear, so I head back into the hall to check the second room. I keep my NOD down over my eyes as I crack the door, but upon seeing red lighting in the room, I flip it up again quickly. I open the door and swing in with my pistol. Two heads turn my way in surprise, and then in utter shock, because an armed man dressed in black with his face covered is an understandably distressing sight. Illuminated by dim red light, a young woman sits on a bed; she’s wearing a dirty button-down shirt sized for a man. It’s open and her large breasts are exposed. Her hair is frazzled, she has an unkempt and tired appearance, and her face is a mask of horror now as she looks my way. She has a black eye that looks fresh to me, even in the weird lighting. And standing above her at the side of the bed is an older man with his shirt off, his girth hanging over his pants

emotional story arc

Click anywhere on the chart to see the most significant emotional words — both positive & negative — from the corresponding section of the text…
This chart visualizes the the shifting emotional balance for the arc of this story, based on the emotional strength of the words in the prose, using techniques pioneered by the UVM Computational Story Lab. To create this story arc, we divided the complete manuscript text into 50 equal-sized chunks, each with 3202.34 words, and then we scored each section by counting the number of strongly-emotional words, both positive and negative. The bars in the chart move downward whenever there’s conflict and sadness, and they move upward when conflicts are resolved, or when the characters are happy and content. The size of each bar represents the positive or negative word-count of that section.

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