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The Entity Game

  by Lisa Shearin


(about 288 pages)
72,092
total words
of all the books in our library
32.61%
vividness
of all the books in our library
10.21%
passive voice
of all the books in our library
2.65%
all adverbs
of all the books in our library
1.00%
ly-adverbs
of all the books in our library
1.65%
non-ly-adverbs
of all the books in our library

clippings from this book

We’ve analyzed hundreds of millions of words, from thousands of different authors, training our linguistic models to recognize the most vivid words in the English language… the words that create the most intense sensory experiences: colors, textures, sounds, flavors, and aromas.

Based on our analysis, we’ve scanned through the pages of this book to find the two pages at the extremes, both the most-passive and the most-vivid pages, so that you can compare them side-by-side and see the difference:

MOST PASSIVE PAGE
MOST VIVID PAGE
No, and I wish he had. That just means somebody else did, and I don’t know who or why. But Gabriel Marshall does.” Berta scowled. “I’m not surprised. You didn’t get a sense of someone having been in your office who didn’t belong—aside from Marshall?” “None. And I’m tuned to that sort of thing. I know if someone has been in my home who doesn’t belong.” “Maybe it was someone who did belong. Have those security people been in your apartment?” “Yes, but other than last night, it’s been at least six months.” “Had any repairs done?” “None. Believe me, I’ve been wracking my brain trying to think of who it could be. Tell me everything you know about Gabriel Marshall.” “Apparently I don’t know everything. I didn’t know he was psychokinetic.” I grinned. “Is that why you kept your gun on him?” “That and he just pisses me off.” “I can see how he’d do that. Neither you nor Rees likes him. May I ask what he did to earn it?” “Marshall works for the CIA, but they’ve been known to greenlight his ‘cooperation’ with other agencies if the CIA wants to be owed a big favor.” “He lets himself be used as currency? That’s surprising.” “No one uses Gabriel Marshall, and he doesn’t take orders. He’s a wild card, but he’s good at what he does, so the CIA lets him call the shots.” She paused. “Literally.” “He’s an assassin?” “He was, and probably still is. He’s style at the Dulles baggage claim. The cart driver was female, young, and pixie cute. I should’ve known. I wondered if that’d been happenstance, or if Grandad had reserved her along with the cart. He was movie-star handsome and attracted plenty of attention wherever he went. I’d always thought he resembled Douglas Fairbanks, Jr. in his silver fox days. Grandad’s suit, topped by a long cashmere coat and a hat tipped at a rakish angle, only emphasized his aged swashbuckler look. I suddenly regretted this afternoon’s wardrobe choices. I’d dressed for warmth and comfort, not New York Fashion Week. It was too late now. Grandad spotted me and his face lit up. “Ciao, bella!” Instantly, everyone looked for the gorgeous creature that had to be the object of such a greeting. What they found was me. A few people glanced back and forth between the two of us in confusion. I’ll have you know I clean up very well. Just not this afternoon. I was wearing jeans and a sweater, topped by a fun and funky car coat I’d found in a vintage clothing store. I was wearing my favorite combat boots in deference to the slushy patches left from the last snow—and present circumstances. Grandad was Hollywood’s Golden Age. I was shabby chic—and proud of it. Grandad used his cane to disembark. He didn’t really need it; he just liked the look of it. Like me, Grandad was fond of his accessories. He’d had his sword cane

emotional story arc

Click anywhere on the chart to see the most significant emotional words — both positive & negative — from the corresponding section of the text…
This chart visualizes the the shifting emotional balance for the arc of this story, based on the emotional strength of the words in the prose, using techniques pioneered by the UVM Computational Story Lab. To create this story arc, we divided the complete manuscript text into 50 equal-sized chunks, each with 1441.84 words, and then we scored each section by counting the number of strongly-emotional words, both positive and negative. The bars in the chart move downward whenever there’s conflict and sadness, and they move upward when conflicts are resolved, or when the characters are happy and content. The size of each bar represents the positive or negative word-count of that section.

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