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Enemy of the State

  by Kyle Mills


(about 409 pages)
102,169
total words
of all the books in our library
32.99%
vividness
of all the books in our library
9.42%
passive voice
of all the books in our library
2.99%
all adverbs
of all the books in our library
1.32%
ly-adverbs
of all the books in our library
1.67%
non-ly-adverbs
of all the books in our library

clippings from this book

We’ve analyzed hundreds of millions of words, from thousands of different authors, training our linguistic models to recognize the most vivid words in the English language… the words that create the most intense sensory experiences: colors, textures, sounds, flavors, and aromas.

Based on our analysis, we’ve scanned through the pages of this book to find the two pages at the extremes, both the most-passive and the most-vivid pages, so that you can compare them side-by-side and see the difference:

MOST PASSIVE PAGE
MOST VIVID PAGE
they had been forced to put a reluctant Joe Maslick in charge. And while Mas was a hell of an operator, he was no Scott Coleman. “Where’s Claudia?” Rapp said. There was no point in hiding from the subject. “Apparently there’s a sleepover at your house tonight and she has her hands full.” He was surprised at the relief he felt. She hadn’t been expecting to have to pick him up and it was entirely plausible that Anna had friends over. Maybe this wasn’t her drawing a line in the sand. “So why are you here?” “Somebody had to come and get your ass.” That story sounded a bit thin. Sitting for extended periods of time was hard for him and he had people he could have sent. There was more to this and it wasn’t hard to guess what it was. “What happened in Rabat?” Rapp said. Coleman didn’t immediately answer, instead accelerating up the road. “There was a problem.” “Are any of our guys hurt?” “Nah. They’re all fine.” “And the Egyptian?” “There was no Egyptian, Mitch. Our intel was bad. The courier was a Saudi prince.” “Do we have him?” “So, the thing is—” “Do we have him?” “No.” “Why the fuck not?” “He was traveling in an armored vehicle and there were two guards with—” “You’re telling me that Mas, Bruno, and Wick can’t handle two guards and a little armor?” “What I’m telling you is that the prince in question is Faisal’s nephew.” “I don’t waistband. Black swatted at an imaginary fly in order to get his hand next to the Beretta he had stuffed in his waistband. It turned out to be unnecessary. The African just pulled out a small leather pouch containing a diamond nearly the size of a golf ball. Two minutes later Black was standing in a cloud of dust with that stone safely in his pocket. He leaned against the jeep he’d been left, watching the truck full of weapons struggle to keep up with the general’s motorcade. The cold sweat of fear turned into the hot sweat of being stuck in the desert with nothing but a piece-of-shit jeep and a pair of flip-flops for transportation. Fucking Mitch Rapp. The rebel jeep was still holding together as Black crossed the White Nile and headed into Juba. After hours of nothing but dust and rock, the landscape turned green, with majestic trees and tended fields dotting the landscape. Not that any of those things were easy to make out. The on-again, off-again civil war had done a job on the city’s power infrastructure, leaving it in a permanent gloom. He had to rely on his one working headlight to navigate the roads, weaving through pedestrians, bicycles, and the occasional farm animal. Finally he turned onto a quiet street that dead-ended into an old church. Its faded yellow walls were still structurally sound, as was most of the roof, but that was about it. The windows were boarded up, the steeple

emotional story arc

Click anywhere on the chart to see the most significant emotional words — both positive & negative — from the corresponding section of the text…
This chart visualizes the the shifting emotional balance for the arc of this story, based on the emotional strength of the words in the prose, using techniques pioneered by the UVM Computational Story Lab. To create this story arc, we divided the complete manuscript text into 50 equal-sized chunks, each with 2043.38 words, and then we scored each section by counting the number of strongly-emotional words, both positive and negative. The bars in the chart move downward whenever there’s conflict and sadness, and they move upward when conflicts are resolved, or when the characters are happy and content. The size of each bar represents the positive or negative word-count of that section.

similar books by different authors

other books by Kyle Mills

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