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Lies She Never Told Me

  by John Ellsworth


(about 247 pages)
61,659
total words
of all the books in our library
40.73%
vividness
of all the books in our library
7.68%
passive voice
of all the books in our library
3.06%
all adverbs
of all the books in our library
0.78%
ly-adverbs
of all the books in our library
2.29%
non-ly-adverbs
of all the books in our library

clippings from this book

We’ve analyzed hundreds of millions of words, from thousands of different authors, training our linguistic models to recognize the most vivid words in the English language… the words that create the most intense sensory experiences: colors, textures, sounds, flavors, and aromas.

Based on our analysis, we’ve scanned through the pages of this book to find the two pages at the extremes, both the most-passive and the most-vivid pages, so that you can compare them side-by-side and see the difference:

MOST PASSIVE PAGE
MOST VIVID PAGE
are tough times in America, this Great Depression. I have worried so often about you.” “No, really, Knowles is paid by the government, and so there’s always enough.” Her father nodded approvingly and stirred his coffee refill. “What about a man for you? Is there someone dear?” “Not at the moment. There have been men I’ve dated, but nothing serious. My work is very demanding and, in all honesty, I don’t know how I could ever give a man the attention he would deserve. I wouldn’t do that to someone right now, Papa.” He sniffed. “So, no grandchildren from my daughter? That makes me sad.” Her heart fell. A great sorrow settled over her as she forced herself to keep still about her children. He would never know. “Don’t be sad. I’m sure it will happen sometime.” “So, there is hope?” “Papa, there is always hope.” “Now I must ask you one more thing. Mama made me promise to ask.” “Or Course.” “What of this Senator Knowles? Do you have feelings for him? Mama wants to know.” “Senator Gresham? Goodness, no, Papa. I would never do that to dear Natalia. I am the same as you, Papa. I would never do such a thing. How could I ever face you and Mama if I did?” “Good, good. She will be relieved. As am I. Now, when am I going to come visit at your home?” “Tomorrow for lunch? Is that good?’ “That is perfect. In the morning I will have that Chicago cops often earned more money in plain brown bags than from the city. A rich opulence characterized 1910 fashion in America in contrast with the somber practicality of garments worn during World War 1. Men’s trousers were creased and cuffed at the ankles. With the coming Jazz Age, skirts rose from floor length to well above the ankle. Women began to bob their hair, everybody who was anybody was keeping up with the exciting new fashions associated with the Jazz Age of the 1920s. Leon Gresham, Knowles’ uncle, was a transplant from Southern England. He determined he would become as American as anyone else. One way was keeping up with styles in clothing. He wore his tailored suits and vests in vibrant colors and cuts. He preferred pinstripes, heavily starched white shirts with detachable collars, necktie pins that looked like expensive diamonds, and two-tone shoes—all of it topped off with a derby hat for the sidewalks and roadways. Uncle Leon was an alderman and entrepreneur offering day-old vegetables and day-old baked goods from his neighborhood grocery on Polk Street. From a young age, Knowles swept his Uncle Leon’s store, wrangled the garbage at the end of the day, and at night would accompany Uncle Leon to aldermanic meetings where the city’s business was transacted. Most often, the sessions involved the three construction czars who had commandeered the city’s road-building business and were making a killing turning third-class dirt and cobblestone roads into brand-spanking-new asphalt ribbons of highway

emotional story arc

Click anywhere on the chart to see the most significant emotional words — both positive & negative — from the corresponding section of the text…
This chart visualizes the the shifting emotional balance for the arc of this story, based on the emotional strength of the words in the prose, using techniques pioneered by the UVM Computational Story Lab. To create this story arc, we divided the complete manuscript text into 50 equal-sized chunks, each with 1233.18 words, and then we scored each section by counting the number of strongly-emotional words, both positive and negative. The bars in the chart move downward whenever there’s conflict and sadness, and they move upward when conflicts are resolved, or when the characters are happy and content. The size of each bar represents the positive or negative word-count of that section.

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other books by John Ellsworth

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