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La Jolla Law

  by John Ellsworth


(about 300 pages)
75,031
total words
of all the books in our library
36.16%
vividness
of all the books in our library
8.79%
passive voice
of all the books in our library
3.06%
all adverbs
of all the books in our library
0.76%
ly-adverbs
of all the books in our library
2.30%
non-ly-adverbs
of all the books in our library

clippings from this book

We’ve analyzed hundreds of millions of words, from thousands of different authors, training our linguistic models to recognize the most vivid words in the English language… the words that create the most intense sensory experiences: colors, textures, sounds, flavors, and aromas.

Based on our analysis, we’ve scanned through the pages of this book to find the two pages at the extremes, both the most-passive and the most-vivid pages, so that you can compare them side-by-side and see the difference:

MOST PASSIVE PAGE
MOST VIVID PAGE
even had hair.” “Did he say anything to you?” “I don’t think so. I was passed out during most of it, except just after he cut off my finger when I came to and screamed. Then I passed out again.” “Who are your enemies?” “In truth? The work I do is quiet and removed from the world, and my only real contacts are an engineer or two. Out of all these people, I don’t have any enemies. I haven’t pissed off anyone in traffic, and I haven’t broken up with a boyfriend in over a year.” “Think hard about this—is anyone jealous of you?” She hesitated before answering, “I have done something I don’t ordinarily do. I slept with a member of the band. I don’t know who knows that, and it only happened twice. But he doesn’t have any girlfriends because his parents really didn’t allow it at his age.” “Do you know his parents?” “I’ve met his father, who is also his manager. He seems like a pretty down-to-earth guy.” “What about the young man himself? Would he have done something like this?” “Do you mean was it him?” “I’m asking whether it might’ve been him and you didn’t recognize him.” “I’m sure it wasn’t him. Butchy’s just a kid. He would never do something like this. It’s just not how he is.” “Did he say anything?” “No.” “Then how do you know it wasn’t Butchy.” “Butchy and I have a thing. He wouldn’t do this.” “I’m a paper bag containing the running pants worn by Moonbeam Russet. The Corolla’s amber carpet was slightly damp beneath the paper bag. It wasn’t the first time the amber carpet had gathered such evidence. Nor would it be the last. At 9:55, Thaddeus was buzzed by the front desk of the La Valencia Hotel. Reggie Pelham was on his way upstairs for their appointment. Thaddeus was ready with his laptop and some preliminary research he’d retrieved last night after meeting with Butchy and his dad. Pelham made his way inside, and they retreated to the office just off the living space. They took chairs at the desk and were now overlooking the beach and ocean just beyond. Thaddeus could make out a large family of seals just offshore, mothers teaching babies how to fish. Pelham was wearing leather running shoes, five-hundred-dollar blue jeans, a white dress shirt open at the throat, and a thick gold chain from where suspended a small pendent with the word SkoolDaze in raised gold lettering. He wore a diamond-encrusted ring on his right middle finger. His left ring finger was bare, but there was a band of lighter skin the width of a wedding band now removed. He crossed his feet under the table and sat back, arms folded, in the manner of one preparing to watch a horserace. In comparison, Thaddeus was wearing baggy shorts, flip-flops, and a T-shirt with a picture of a surfer. He wore no jewelry, and his clear-framed eyeglasses

emotional story arc

Click anywhere on the chart to see the most significant emotional words — both positive & negative — from the corresponding section of the text…
This chart visualizes the the shifting emotional balance for the arc of this story, based on the emotional strength of the words in the prose, using techniques pioneered by the UVM Computational Story Lab. To create this story arc, we divided the complete manuscript text into 50 equal-sized chunks, each with 1500.62 words, and then we scored each section by counting the number of strongly-emotional words, both positive and negative. The bars in the chart move downward whenever there’s conflict and sadness, and they move upward when conflicts are resolved, or when the characters are happy and content. The size of each bar represents the positive or negative word-count of that section.

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