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The Paris Betrayal

  by James R. Hannibal


(about 357 pages)
89,151
total words
of all the books in our library
58.44%
vividness
of all the books in our library
5.41%
passive voice
of all the books in our library
1.74%
all adverbs
of all the books in our library
0.39%
ly-adverbs
of all the books in our library
1.35%
non-ly-adverbs
of all the books in our library

clippings from this book

We’ve analyzed hundreds of millions of words, from thousands of different authors, training our linguistic models to recognize the most vivid words in the English language… the words that create the most intense sensory experiences: colors, textures, sounds, flavors, and aromas.

Based on our analysis, we’ve scanned through the pages of this book to find the two pages at the extremes, both the most-passive and the most-vivid pages, so that you can compare them side-by-side and see the difference:

MOST PASSIVE PAGE
MOST VIVID PAGE
river. I’ve been patrolling the south bank. Tell me. Where is the girl?” He must not have seen Ben leaving the cathedral earlier. He hadn’t found Clara’s hiding place. “She ditched me.” “Smart girl. I’ll find her for you. I’ll take good care of her.” A surge of pain washed through Ben’s head, sending another wave of nausea through his gut. It might have been concern for Clara. Then again, he’d taken two good knocks in the same day. He’d be lucky to get out of this without long-term damage. Duval had him—wounded and covered. But the cop hadn’t called in the troops. Not a good sign. “Who are you working for? Jupiter? Leviathan?” Duval’s eyes went vacant for a fraction of a second. He didn’t seem to recognize those names. Ben chuckled. “Do you even know who you’re working for?” “I work for a man who pays well and wants to speak with you. That is enough.” So, he didn’t know. Another answer remained out of Ben’s reach. “Sorry to disappoint your boss, but I won’t be taken alive.” “I can’t tell you how gratified I am to hear you say that.” “Don’t be. Previous experience tells us your chances of winning this fight are slim.” Ben’s hand inched along his hip. The cop saw. “Yes. Good.” Duval slowly raised the revolver to level, clenching his jaw against the pain. “A gunfight is what I want, like something from your Old West movies. But before we see who’s mud caked on his hoodie and jeans. Disease or not, he didn’t want to see the Director that way. “Better shower first.” Ben pulled the hoodie and T-shirt over his head in a single gingerly move, and the shriveled, spotted thing staring back at him from the mirror sucked away whatever heat remained in his blood. Día de Muertos. The creature in the mirror reminded Ben of a Day of the Dead costume. Dark veins crept up his neck and the right side of his face to blacken the skin at the corner of his mouth and beneath his eye. The blotches on his chest and right arm had swollen into bulging knots. The oldest, on his abdomen, had broken the skin and crusted over with pus. Ben grabbed the toilet’s rim and retched. Both mind and body wanted to expel this dark spirit. A half-digested egg white protein bar splashed down, surrounded by yellow bile and red swirls of blood. Blood. The same decay he saw on the outside had eaten into the lining of his stomach. Had it set to work on his organs too? He needed to be careful. His blood contained deadly pathogens. Ben poured bleach into the bowl. Stumbling into the bedroom, he ripped open his backpack and fished around inside. “Come on. Where are you?” He turned the bag upside down and shook it. Tools, first aid supplies, and homemade explosives wrapped in cellophane spilled out. With one more shake, Tess’s cocktail injector dropped

emotional story arc

Click anywhere on the chart to see the most significant emotional words — both positive & negative — from the corresponding section of the text…
This chart visualizes the the shifting emotional balance for the arc of this story, based on the emotional strength of the words in the prose, using techniques pioneered by the UVM Computational Story Lab. To create this story arc, we divided the complete manuscript text into 50 equal-sized chunks, each with 1783.02 words, and then we scored each section by counting the number of strongly-emotional words, both positive and negative. The bars in the chart move downward whenever there’s conflict and sadness, and they move upward when conflicts are resolved, or when the characters are happy and content. The size of each bar represents the positive or negative word-count of that section.

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other books by James R. Hannibal

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