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Two from the Heart

  by James Patterson


(about 198 pages)
49,508
total words
of all the books in our library
59.49%
vividness
of all the books in our library
7.35%
passive voice
of all the books in our library
3.36%
all adverbs
of all the books in our library
1.24%
ly-adverbs
of all the books in our library
2.12%
non-ly-adverbs
of all the books in our library

clippings from this book

We’ve analyzed hundreds of millions of words, from thousands of different authors, training our linguistic models to recognize the most vivid words in the English language… the words that create the most intense sensory experiences: colors, textures, sounds, flavors, and aromas.

Based on our analysis, we’ve scanned through the pages of this book to find the two pages at the extremes, both the most-passive and the most-vivid pages, so that you can compare them side-by-side and see the difference:

MOST PASSIVE PAGE
MOST VIVID PAGE
can’t just leave your house half wrecked,” Sam said. But why not? I certainly couldn’t live in it. And the more they tried to persuade me that it was crucial I stick around, the more certain I was that I’d be leaving in the morning. “My couch is your couch,” Sam was saying. “And Lorelei’s got a spare bedroom.” “You guys really are the best,” I said. “So you’ll stay?” I smiled again, and this time I felt what might have been a tiny sliver of hope. “I’ve got other plans,” I said. ALL RIGHT, so calling them “plans” was something of a stretch. I’d decided to go visit my brother in Roanoke, but after that? I didn’t know. I figured I’d see where the winds took me. I’d just hope they wouldn’t be gale force, because I’d had enough of those. By some miracle, my car—a formerly gorgeous vintage Mercedes I’d named Beatrice, now salt-streaked and rusted—still ran. I quickly loaded it with things I’d need for the trip: inland clothes (no flip-flops, no baggy beach dresses), a few slightly soggy books I’d been meaning to read, and my laptop and phone. Though it wasn’t particularly practical, I took my spider plant from its place on the windowsill and set it on the front seat. I’d had it since I was a freshman in college, and it seemed cruel to leave it behind. It was the closest thing I had to a pet. “I guess you’ll be bare except for some IKEA-style furniture. The bed is made—not perfect, but neat. No signs of a struggle, as they say on the cop shows. He slides the bedroom closet door open. Empty—except for one white blouse and one black skirt. He checks the medicine cabinet. Contact lens solution, toothpaste, aspirin—the usual. Not much in the refrigerator—just a carton of orange juice, some cottage cheese, and a couple of beers. Bron pulls open the kitchen drawers and finds some plastic flatware and paper napkins. And then… he feels something. Something that doesn’t quite fit. Tucked under a cheese grater and a pair of oven mitts is an eight by ten manila envelope, the kind with a metal clasp at the top. Bron opens the clasp. Pulls out the contents. And feels his heart thud through his chest. HE’S LOOKING at a stack of identical black-and-white glossy photos. They’re headshots—the standard calling card for models and actors. A dozen copies. The name printed in script at the bottom of the photo isSunny Lynn Aberday.” His stomach freezes. Of course it’s her, but somehow not her. The hair is shorter and straighter, with some serious studio styling—and her freckles are missing. Photoshopped clean off. To the right of the full-face photo are two smaller head-to-toe shots in color—one showing her in a red bikini, the other in a flower-print sundress. Girl-next-door gorgeous. On the back are her vital stats: hair color, eye color, height

emotional story arc

Click anywhere on the chart to see the most significant emotional words — both positive & negative — from the corresponding section of the text…
This chart visualizes the the shifting emotional balance for the arc of this story, based on the emotional strength of the words in the prose, using techniques pioneered by the UVM Computational Story Lab. To create this story arc, we divided the complete manuscript text into 50 equal-sized chunks, each with 990.16 words, and then we scored each section by counting the number of strongly-emotional words, both positive and negative. The bars in the chart move downward whenever there’s conflict and sadness, and they move upward when conflicts are resolved, or when the characters are happy and content. The size of each bar represents the positive or negative word-count of that section.

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