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Target: Alex Cross

  by James Patterson


(about 335 pages)
83,797
total words
of all the books in our library
51.02%
vividness
of all the books in our library
6.05%
passive voice
of all the books in our library
2.23%
all adverbs
of all the books in our library
0.64%
ly-adverbs
of all the books in our library
1.58%
non-ly-adverbs
of all the books in our library

clippings from this book

We’ve analyzed hundreds of millions of words, from thousands of different authors, training our linguistic models to recognize the most vivid words in the English language… the words that create the most intense sensory experiences: colors, textures, sounds, flavors, and aromas.

Based on our analysis, we’ve scanned through the pages of this book to find the two pages at the extremes, both the most-passive and the most-vivid pages, so that you can compare them side-by-side and see the difference:

MOST PASSIVE PAGE
MOST VIVID PAGE
I can feel it.” Bree was quiet for several moments before saying, “This doesn’t sound like you at all, Alex. Seeing riderless horses. How much sleep have you been getting?” “This has nothing to do with sleep, and I didn’t see the horse. I just remembered it. This really has to do with Senator Walker getting killed, probably by Thomas, who was then killed either by Varjan or whoever beat Sergeant Moon to death.” “Alex, there’s a lot of conjecture in what you’re saying. Especially the idea that there are more assassins than we know about.” “I’m saying we should be proceeding based on that assumption. If I’m wrong, I’m wrong. But I don’t think I am.” Bree was quiet again but studying me. “What do you think these assassins are going to do?” “I … I don’t know. But if they were part of a plot that begins with the killing of a sitting U.S. senator, draw your own conclusions.” “I can’t draw any conclusions,” she said. “We don’t have enough facts.” “I’m telling you, something brutal is going to happen in the District, maybe today.” I could see her getting more frustrated by the moment. “What do you want me to do? Put all my detectives on the streets? Ask Michaels to double the shift? Put every cop on patrol because your gut says so?” “That would be a start,” I said. She threw up her hands. “Well, I’m not in a position to do that.” “You should hilly; it was forested in bare oaks and clad in four inches of fresh snow. Franks passed a short driveway and saw an opportunity that made him smile. Beyond some pines, two hundred yards farther on, he came upon the relic of a farmhouse, windowless, siding peeled to bare board and rotten. The barn’s roof was caved in. No sign of life anywhere. Even better. Franks pulled into the overgrown lane and parked the white Tahoe behind a gnarled old spruce and crab-apple trees laden with snow. His wiser, more experienced self said to sit there a few moments, breathe, and consider other options. But then, even with the window closed, he heard the buzz of a chain saw. It almost took his breath away. Throwing caution to the wind, he reached around beneath the seat behind him, grabbed a few things, and climbed out. The snow came up over Franks’s ankles, running shoes, socks, and the bottom of his leggings. His feet felt cold and wet almost immediately, but he didn’t care. He pulled up the hood of his black fleece jacket against the wind and broke into a jog, passing an old chicken coop in the overgrown farmyard as he headed toward a stand of mature pine trees and the revving, biting sounds of that saw. FRANKS DUCKED INTO a pine break planted ages ago. No doubt meant to block the view of nosy neighbors, he thought, ignoring the fluffy snow that sloughed off the boughs and clung

emotional story arc

Click anywhere on the chart to see the most significant emotional words — both positive & negative — from the corresponding section of the text…
This chart visualizes the the shifting emotional balance for the arc of this story, based on the emotional strength of the words in the prose, using techniques pioneered by the UVM Computational Story Lab. To create this story arc, we divided the complete manuscript text into 50 equal-sized chunks, each with 1675.94 words, and then we scored each section by counting the number of strongly-emotional words, both positive and negative. The bars in the chart move downward whenever there’s conflict and sadness, and they move upward when conflicts are resolved, or when the characters are happy and content. The size of each bar represents the positive or negative word-count of that section.

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