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Lethal Trap

  by Jack Parker


(about 436 pages)
108,920
total words
of all the books in our library
23.66%
vividness
of all the books in our library
10.10%
passive voice
of all the books in our library
5.67%
all adverbs
of all the books in our library
2.45%
ly-adverbs
of all the books in our library
3.23%
non-ly-adverbs
of all the books in our library

clippings from this book

We’ve analyzed hundreds of millions of words, from thousands of different authors, training our linguistic models to recognize the most vivid words in the English language… the words that create the most intense sensory experiences: colors, textures, sounds, flavors, and aromas.

Based on our analysis, we’ve scanned through the pages of this book to find the two pages at the extremes, both the most-passive and the most-vivid pages, so that you can compare them side-by-side and see the difference:

MOST PASSIVE PAGE
MOST VIVID PAGE
was after him and my mother, how? And why? And was Arthur Carlson too late? If he had been there a little bit sooner, would my whole life have changed? Most probably. I would probably be a normal person doing all those things that normal people do. I wouldn’t know thirty-six ways on how to kill a person without a weapon. I wouldn’t be lying to these apparently really good and trusting people in front of me. I wouldn’t have blood in my hands. It’s hard, trying to stop myself from blaming him. If he could have just been there sooner, then I wouldn’t have had to suffer. I’d probably be here in this exact same place and it wouldn’t be a CIA base of operations. I’d be drinking beer and sharing stories and just laughing like a stupid kid with these people. But I know I didn’t have any right to blame Arthur Carlson. He did what he had to do and he’s too late and it’s not his fault. Maybe it goes like that for me too. I did what I had to do to survive and it wasn’t pretty and it was bloody and frightening and painful, but it wasn’t my fault, was it? I could only hope. I hear Mandy’s voice from beside me, and I snap out from my thoughts. There’d be plenty of time to think about that in the future. I have to focus now. “… and he’s really hot,” she finishes. Apparently, she’s killing me. “Okay then, on three.” He says, placing a hand on my bad arm and another on my bad shoulder. He says, “One,” and then pulls as hard as he can and just. Fuck. Shit. Damn. Holy fucking shit. He always does this. Sometimes on one or two, sometimes he doesn’t even count, and I still fall victim to it. Every fucking time. The bone slots back into place but it still stings like a mother. He grabs the bag of frozen peas and slaps it onto my shoulder unceremoniously. “There. Told you you’ll live. We didn’t rip the stitches. Ha. I’m good.” I give him a sarcastic smile but I say, “Thanks", anyway. “Hey, Eddie, could you finish this up? You just need to clean around the stitches and slap some gauze on it. I’ll just go and find a sling for the princess.” James says as he cleans the table of anything he used while stitching me up. “Yeah sure,” Eddie answers. James pushes me back onto the couch, dropping the bag of peas back on the coffee table, and then goes inside his bedroom to find a sling. “He seems used to this.” Eddie says as he sits behind me and starts to dab antiseptic to the wound on my shoulder blade. “Field medic training,” I repeat the lie I told him before. We fall silent then, me just watching the stains on the carpet and him just cleaning around my wound. It feels oddly relaxing

emotional story arc

Click anywhere on the chart to see the most significant emotional words — both positive & negative — from the corresponding section of the text…
This chart visualizes the the shifting emotional balance for the arc of this story, based on the emotional strength of the words in the prose, using techniques pioneered by the UVM Computational Story Lab. To create this story arc, we divided the complete manuscript text into 50 equal-sized chunks, each with 2178.40 words, and then we scored each section by counting the number of strongly-emotional words, both positive and negative. The bars in the chart move downward whenever there’s conflict and sadness, and they move upward when conflicts are resolved, or when the characters are happy and content. The size of each bar represents the positive or negative word-count of that section.

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