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Man on Edge

  by Humphrey Hawksley


(about 367 pages)
91,759
total words
of all the books in our library
60.70%
vividness
of all the books in our library
6.58%
passive voice
of all the books in our library
1.69%
all adverbs
of all the books in our library
0.48%
ly-adverbs
of all the books in our library
1.21%
non-ly-adverbs
of all the books in our library

clippings from this book

We’ve analyzed hundreds of millions of words, from thousands of different authors, training our linguistic models to recognize the most vivid words in the English language… the words that create the most intense sensory experiences: colors, textures, sounds, flavors, and aromas.

Based on our analysis, we’ve scanned through the pages of this book to find the two pages at the extremes, both the most-passive and the most-vivid pages, so that you can compare them side-by-side and see the difference:

MOST PASSIVE PAGE
MOST VIVID PAGE
all that was wrong with her parents’ marriage. Yumatov’s tracking was out by several hundred yards. Carrie wasn’t in Three Stations Square. She was inside Leningradsky Station. You are booked on the 1-28 Allegro to Helsinki,’ said Yumatov. ‘Take your passport to the ticket office. They will issue you the ticket. You have a first-class sleeper.’ Thank you.’ Promise you do that, Carrie. I can get you through. The FSB will handle the Helsinki route. The other routes are domestic, controlled by the police, even the GRU, and you will be compromised. Once in Helsinki you will be safe.’ She kept walking to see if Yumatov noticed her moving. ‘The men who held me in the van, are they dead?’ Yes.’ Did you kill them?’ No. What happened was terrible.’ Did you order them to kidnap me?’ Yes. For your safety.’ I was going to the British Embassy. That would have been safe.’ You’re not meant to be in Russia, Carrie. This isn’t your fight.’ What do you want from me?’ I want you safely out of Russia.’ Then get me through an airport. UA to Washington.’ Yumatov’s voice hardened. ‘Don’t be stupid and stubborn. Do what I say and tomorrow morning you’ll be in Europe and safe. Don’t and you’ll end up shot like those in that van. I am telling you how things are about to go down. It’s much bigger than either you or me, Carrie, and you don’t want to be here for it.’ You have street wisdom wasn’t great. She spotted the bar with the flashing yellow sign Врачи-кафе, Doctors’ Cafe, in a shabby, paint-peeled building a block from the hospital on Prospekt Mira. A red and green laser logo danced on the frozen sidewalk. Two torch flames flanked the doorway. A hat-check girl offered to take her coat. Carrie kept it, refused the lift, climbed five flights of chipped concrete stairs to the roof where arcs of warmth from gas heaters mixed with icy night air. Just inside a door alcove, she eyed trauma bags in the corner, left like briefcases in a cloakroom, heavy duty kit, that would contain blood-clotters, intravenous drips, tourniquets with buckles, and powerful drugs. She had called it right, a place for serious medics. There was a bar, glasses and bottles reflected in its polished stainless steel, with stools and small tables. She saw no barman. White muslin curtains hung from the ceiling to separate the bar area from a dining room. No one there, either. Another space by a white brick fireplace with comfortable white chairs, chess and backgammon tables. Empty, too. Further in there was low lounge jazz music and conversation buzz, more commentary and argument, far from the relaxed unwinding bar-room medic conversation she had expected. About forty people, some in paramedic tunics, mostly jeans and leather or denim jackets, clustered around a television screen on the wall. We need to nail him,’ said a woman at the back, pausing from drawing a cocktail through a straw

emotional story arc

Click anywhere on the chart to see the most significant emotional words — both positive & negative — from the corresponding section of the text…
This chart visualizes the the shifting emotional balance for the arc of this story, based on the emotional strength of the words in the prose, using techniques pioneered by the UVM Computational Story Lab. To create this story arc, we divided the complete manuscript text into 50 equal-sized chunks, each with 1835.18 words, and then we scored each section by counting the number of strongly-emotional words, both positive and negative. The bars in the chart move downward whenever there’s conflict and sadness, and they move upward when conflicts are resolved, or when the characters are happy and content. The size of each bar represents the positive or negative word-count of that section.

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