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The Paladin

  by David Ignatius


(about 395 pages)
98,665
total words
of all the books in our library
44.36%
vividness
of all the books in our library
8.16%
passive voice
of all the books in our library
2.46%
all adverbs
of all the books in our library
0.73%
ly-adverbs
of all the books in our library
1.73%
non-ly-adverbs
of all the books in our library

clippings from this book

We’ve analyzed hundreds of millions of words, from thousands of different authors, training our linguistic models to recognize the most vivid words in the English language… the words that create the most intense sensory experiences: colors, textures, sounds, flavors, and aromas.

Based on our analysis, we’ve scanned through the pages of this book to find the two pages at the extremes, both the most-passive and the most-vivid pages, so that you can compare them side-by-side and see the difference:

MOST PASSIVE PAGE
MOST VIVID PAGE
It’s true,” said White. “Mike was set up. I need to talk to a lawyer before I do any confessing, but what Mike says about a conspiracy is true.” Ellison studied the bizarre scene and tried to make sense of it: His friend, a former CIA officer who had served a year in prison, had evidently kidnapped a man who was a serving CIA officer, and was holding him hostage – and counting on Ellison to be his accomplice. “Call the FBI,” said Ellison. “They’ll sort this out.” “Not now,” said Dunne. “Not yet. These people are powerful. If we move now, they’ll disappear. You saw what they did to me two years ago? They’ll do it again. They don’t care about the FBI. They have their own country.” “I could get disbarred. Lose my job.” “I know. It’s a big ask. It’s just, I’m on my own here. You’re the only normal friend I have who I can trust.” Ellison lowered his head. He was a normal friend, it was true. “I’m not agreeing. But what do you want me to do?” “Watch Adrian. Feed him. Take him to the toilet. Keep the DO NOT DISTURB sign on the door. If you want to move him somewhere else, that’s fine. Just make sure he doesn’t communicate with anyone until Monday noon. That’s all I need.” “But that’s illegal.” “No, it’s not. You’re an officer of the court. You’ve become aware that a crime is about to be committed. I have a small suite, with a sitting room opening onto a bedroom done in blue and white: blue-veined marble on the walls, white linens topped by a blue twill spread. Laid out on the bed was a small wardrobe. Trousers, shirts, sweater, all made of the finest Italian fabrics. At the foot of the bed was a royal-blue swimsuit. Dunne stripped and walked to the bathroom. Like everything else in this fantasy vessel, it was perfectly crafted, with a double sink, toilet and bidet, and a massive tub and shower. When he returned to the bedroom, Dunne put on his swimming trunks and sandals and a cotton piqué polo shirt. He lay down on the bed and closed his eyes so that he could think. When Dunne felt the boat begin to slow, he roused himself from bed and went back on deck. The crew had maneuvered the giant craft into the bay of an offshore island. The water was a shade of iridescent green; truly, an emerald coast. The crew dropped the anchor and opened the back hatch to launch the motorboat, Jet Skis, and other paraphernalia of wealthy leisure. Goldman beckoned from the lower deck. He was dressed in a bathing suit, a baggy shirt, and a Boston Red Sox baseball cap. The launch pulled aside the stern, and Dunne and his host sped off with a rooster plume of wake behind them toward the beach. Goldman turned toward him and spoke above the roar of the outboard motor

emotional story arc

Click anywhere on the chart to see the most significant emotional words — both positive & negative — from the corresponding section of the text…
This chart visualizes the the shifting emotional balance for the arc of this story, based on the emotional strength of the words in the prose, using techniques pioneered by the UVM Computational Story Lab. To create this story arc, we divided the complete manuscript text into 50 equal-sized chunks, each with 1973.30 words, and then we scored each section by counting the number of strongly-emotional words, both positive and negative. The bars in the chart move downward whenever there’s conflict and sadness, and they move upward when conflicts are resolved, or when the characters are happy and content. The size of each bar represents the positive or negative word-count of that section.

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