this is a SHAXPIR project
how does it work?

Drone Strike

  by David Austin


(about 407 pages)
101,637
total words
of all the books in our library
41.16%
vividness
of all the books in our library
5.96%
passive voice
of all the books in our library
1.78%
all adverbs
of all the books in our library
0.63%
ly-adverbs
of all the books in our library
1.15%
non-ly-adverbs
of all the books in our library

clippings from this book

We’ve analyzed hundreds of millions of words, from thousands of different authors, training our linguistic models to recognize the most vivid words in the English language… the words that create the most intense sensory experiences: colors, textures, sounds, flavors, and aromas.

Based on our analysis, we’ve scanned through the pages of this book to find the two pages at the extremes, both the most-passive and the most-vivid pages, so that you can compare them side-by-side and see the difference:

MOST PASSIVE PAGE
MOST VIVID PAGE
once we’re finished here.” Scott dismissed the compliment and asked, “What’s our next move, sir?” “That’s a good question, Scott. I would imagine a precision airstrike would be an option, but I’m not sure the president will be willing to approve what will be a very public attack on a known Russian facility.” “Sir, Tariq Kabbani is in that hangar. Give me a chance to get him out before we consider leveling the place.” Sloan said, “Your dedication to your asset is commendable, Scott. But I can’t risk your safety, or that of Joe’s team, in an assault on such a heavily guarded facility. This may be one of those situations where, as harsh as it sounds, he may have to be sacrificed if it means preventing that Reaper from getting back in the air.” The logical part of Scott’s brain was telling him the director was right. Hell, he’d had to make plenty of tough calls himself over the span of his career, so he got it. But Tariq was not just some low-level informant to be discarded because it was convenient. He had done excellent work. Been loyal. Provided high-quality, actionable intelligence. He deserved better. “There has to be something we can do,” Scott argued. “He’s in there right now getting his faced bashed in, and the best we can do is to drop a bomb on his head? Pardon my bluntness, sir, but that’s bullshit.” No one was more surprised than Joe at the outburst. It was the white H painted on the concrete pad and shut down the engines, allowing the rotors to come to a stop before the next delegation was brought out. It would not do to have the rotor wash ruffle the thobes and keffiyehs or tailored Italian and Saville Row suits of the region’s most wealthy monarchs. Once the next group was onboard and secured in their seats, only then would the rotor’s five blades gently flexing in the warm breeze spin up to full power and lift the helicopter into the air. The well-orchestrated air shuttle and motorcade departures would continue until all the delegations were delivered to the summit. Kuwait International Airport’s VIP terminal was a world-class operation, and no expense had been spared to ensure a premium experience for its clientele. Those amenities extended to the pilots and air crews transporting the rich and famous as well. A gym, showers, twenty-four-hour food service, and an impressive pilotslounge filled the second floor of the facility. On the roof was a large, enclosed and air-conditioned observation deck that provided a view of the tarmac and the expanse of desert beyond the airport’s grounds. Facing west, the deck was a popular spot to watch the sun set as it fell below the horizon. But the man wearing the generic uniform of corporate and charter pilots the world over, dark slacks and a white shirt with epaulets on his shoulders and gold wings pinned above his breast pocket, wasn’t there to watch

emotional story arc

Click anywhere on the chart to see the most significant emotional words — both positive & negative — from the corresponding section of the text…
This chart visualizes the the shifting emotional balance for the arc of this story, based on the emotional strength of the words in the prose, using techniques pioneered by the UVM Computational Story Lab. To create this story arc, we divided the complete manuscript text into 50 equal-sized chunks, each with 2032.74 words, and then we scored each section by counting the number of strongly-emotional words, both positive and negative. The bars in the chart move downward whenever there’s conflict and sadness, and they move upward when conflicts are resolved, or when the characters are happy and content. The size of each bar represents the positive or negative word-count of that section.

similar books by different authors

other books by David Austin

something missing?

Our library is always growing, so check back often…

If you’re an author or a publisher,
contact us at submissions@prosecraft.io to help grow the library.