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American Kompromat

  by Craig Unger


(about 406 pages)
101,474
total words
of all the books in our library
19.28%
vividness
of all the books in our library
6.45%
passive voice
of all the books in our library
2.85%
all adverbs
of all the books in our library
1.30%
ly-adverbs
of all the books in our library
1.55%
non-ly-adverbs
of all the books in our library

clippings from this book

We’ve analyzed hundreds of millions of words, from thousands of different authors, training our linguistic models to recognize the most vivid words in the English language… the words that create the most intense sensory experiences: colors, textures, sounds, flavors, and aromas.

Based on our analysis, we’ve scanned through the pages of this book to find the two pages at the extremes, both the most-passive and the most-vivid pages, so that you can compare them side-by-side and see the difference:

MOST PASSIVE PAGE
MOST VIVID PAGE
Ghislaine talked and acted as if she and Epstein were lovers, but Christina didn’t buy it. Whatever the truth about their relationship, the problem, as Oxenberg saw it, was simple: Ghislaine very much wanted to marry Epstein, but Jeffrey had no interest. “There was no romance and there was no sexual relationship,” Christina told me. “Ghislaine was his employee. But she wanted to get married, to be a real power couple.” According to Christina, Jeffrey’s disinterest notwithstanding, Ghislaine thought she could win him over by making him part of this upper-crust world. “What you do in London if you’re upper class is you give dinner parties,” Christina said. “That’s what they do. So Ghislaine would have brought her knowledge of that to New York, and she does these dinner parties. “Generally, the point is just to get drunk and have really good plonk. That’s the point of dinner parties. But hers were transactional. She had an agenda. She was creating a life for Jeffrey, trying to present him as, ‘Hey, he’s got money. He’s James Bond. He’s someone you should know. He’s cool.’ “She’s branding him, probably showing him not to wear white sneakers and maybe go with the Oxford low scissor with the tassels. He is a Pretty Woman. He doesn’t know shit. She believes that she can make herself indispensable to the point where he will marry her.” Or as Ghislaine also told Christina, “The reason Jeffrey keeps me around is because I don’t make mistakes.” She could White House press secretary Kayleigh McEnany, who said, “AG Barr had determined that we needed to expand the perimeter by one block on each side.” At 6:18 p. m. the Secret Service began moving onto H Street. Three minutes later, according to the Washington Post, law enforcement officers checked on the status of personnel who had training in deploying pepper balls and other irritants. Barr then left the park as a barely audible announcement ordered the crowd to disperse. At 6:32 p. m. military police on the southern edge of the protest area moved forward in a face-to-face confrontation with the protesters. By 6:35 p. m. police in riot gear with shields and clubs began forcing the protesters back, away from Lafayette Square, just as Trump had begun speaking from the Rose Garden. According to a statement by Park Police, at that point, “Violent protesters on H Street NW began throwing projectiles including bricks, frozen water bottles and caustic liquids. The protesters also climbed onto a historic building at the north end of Lafayette Square that was destroyed by arson days prior. Intelligence had revealed calls for violence against the police, and officers found caches of glass bottles, baseball bats and metal poles hidden along the street.” But a review of video footage by the Washington Post showed only water bottles being thrown, and no bricks or caustic liquids. Meanwhile, in the Rose Garden, Trump’s rhetoric rose to new heights as he threatened to deploy US armed

emotional story arc

Click anywhere on the chart to see the most significant emotional words — both positive & negative — from the corresponding section of the text…
This chart visualizes the the shifting emotional balance for the arc of this story, based on the emotional strength of the words in the prose, using techniques pioneered by the UVM Computational Story Lab. To create this story arc, we divided the complete manuscript text into 50 equal-sized chunks, each with 2029.48 words, and then we scored each section by counting the number of strongly-emotional words, both positive and negative. The bars in the chart move downward whenever there’s conflict and sadness, and they move upward when conflicts are resolved, or when the characters are happy and content. The size of each bar represents the positive or negative word-count of that section.

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