this is a SHAXPIR project
how does it work?

Red Specter

  by Brian Andrews & Jeffrey Wilson


(about 486 pages)
121,477
total words
of all the books in our library
45.88%
vividness
of all the books in our library
6.90%
passive voice
of all the books in our library
2.48%
all adverbs
of all the books in our library
0.83%
ly-adverbs
of all the books in our library
1.65%
non-ly-adverbs
of all the books in our library

clippings from this book

We’ve analyzed hundreds of millions of words, from thousands of different authors, training our linguistic models to recognize the most vivid words in the English language… the words that create the most intense sensory experiences: colors, textures, sounds, flavors, and aromas.

Based on our analysis, we’ve scanned through the pages of this book to find the two pages at the extremes, both the most-passive and the most-vivid pages, so that you can compare them side-by-side and see the difference:

MOST PASSIVE PAGE
MOST VIVID PAGE
is how you greet me?” the Russian President said. “Bright Falcon is under attack!” “I know.” “I shouldn’t have to ask this question, Arkady. Is it the Americans?” “I do not have confirmation, but who else could it be?” the old spymaster said. “The audacity,” Petrov shouted. “The unbridled audacity to attack us on Russian sovereign soil. This is an act of war, Arkady. An act of war I tell you!” “It is aggressive and unprecedented, but we have been aggressive, too. We’re already at war with the Americans; it’s just neither side has the balls to admit it. Cyber offensives, false flags, propaganda, proxy operations—both sides have been doing it for a long time now. This is probably payback for Turkey. I think it’s safe to assume Warner knows what you did.” “What I did? No, what you did. All that shit was your idea. Not mine. I went along with it because I trusted you, but now I’m starting to wonder if you’re losing your edge. Maybe it’s time for you to actually retire.” “You’re upset, Mr. President. And you have every right to be, but now is not the time to make snap decisions you might later regret.” “Who are you to lecture me? I’m the President of Russia, not you, old man.” Arkady held his tongue until he’d quelled the urged to fire back. You are a president of my creation, you ass. And you will remain so at my pleasure. Instead he said, “You’re four monitors on the wall opposite the girl powered up, each showing a different live feed from the Ember locker room where an entirely different kind of interrogation was taking place. The upper-left monitor was a bird’s-eye view from a ceiling-mounted camera. The camera was aimed down on a hulking male figure, bound to an armchair positioned in the middle of a heavy-duty plastic tarp spread out on the floor. The upper-right camera feed was zoomed in on a small table shrouded with a medical drape, which was splattered with copious amounts of blood. The table held sundry hand toolshammer, pliers, heavy-duty pruning shears—and a polished metal tray with medical implements—syringes, vials of various liquids, scalpels, clamps, rubber tubing, and little piles of blood-soaked gauze. The bottom-left monitor showed a chest-level view of the scene from behind the captive, and the bottom-right monitor streamed footage from a camera positioned in the back corner. Grimes watched the Russian girl’s eyes tick from monitor to monitor to monitor, her gaze lingering on the feed showing the tools of torture the longest, before finally settling on the bird’s-eye-view feed. In addition to the captive, two other people were present in the room—Munn and Wilson. The former was standing in front of the seated Russian, chest heaving, heavily muscled arms hanging at his sides, his black tactical gloves slick with blood. Wilson, who was dressed in slacks and a suit coat, was pacing the room talking

emotional story arc

Click anywhere on the chart to see the most significant emotional words — both positive & negative — from the corresponding section of the text…
This chart visualizes the the shifting emotional balance for the arc of this story, based on the emotional strength of the words in the prose, using techniques pioneered by the UVM Computational Story Lab. To create this story arc, we divided the complete manuscript text into 50 equal-sized chunks, each with 2429.54 words, and then we scored each section by counting the number of strongly-emotional words, both positive and negative. The bars in the chart move downward whenever there’s conflict and sadness, and they move upward when conflicts are resolved, or when the characters are happy and content. The size of each bar represents the positive or negative word-count of that section.

similar books by different authors

other books by Brian Andrews & Jeffrey Wilson

something missing?

Our library is always growing, so check back often…

If you’re an author or a publisher,
contact us at submissions@prosecraft.io to help grow the library.