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Fire and Forget

  by Andrew Warren


(about 421 pages)
105,351
total words
of all the books in our library
76.30%
vividness
of all the books in our library
5.22%
passive voice
of all the books in our library
1.30%
all adverbs
of all the books in our library
0.23%
ly-adverbs
of all the books in our library
1.08%
non-ly-adverbs
of all the books in our library

clippings from this book

We’ve analyzed hundreds of millions of words, from thousands of different authors, training our linguistic models to recognize the most vivid words in the English language… the words that create the most intense sensory experiences: colors, textures, sounds, flavors, and aromas.

Based on our analysis, we’ve scanned through the pages of this book to find the two pages at the extremes, both the most-passive and the most-vivid pages, so that you can compare them side-by-side and see the difference:

MOST PASSIVE PAGE
MOST VIVID PAGE
have all been doctored. My guess is they’re connected to Delta Blue, but so far, we’ve got nothing conclusive.” “Firepower like that can’t be too hard to trace.” Caine thought for a moment. “Lapinski must have known something. Something big.” “I spoke to him before … before it happened,” Rebecca’s voice crackled back. “He swore he didn’t know who was blackmailing him. I believed him.” She was silent for a moment. “Tom, he did have one name. It was a code name. An asset, someone involved in an old operation of yours.” Caine clenched his teeth. It can’t be, he thought. But he knew what she would say before the words left her mouth. “Puff Adder.” You should know better, he thought. You should have told her! He silenced the guilt that slinked through his mind. “Rebecca, I—” He froze. He had no idea what to say. “You knew, didn’t you? Before I sent you, you knew. Did John Blayne tell you?” Caine said nothing. Empty static crackled over the phone. “Tom, answer me!” “Yes. Blayne told me. When I found him, he was in a meeting of some kind, a video conference call. I didn’t see who was on the call. I think Bernatto was one of them. And I think ‘Puff Adder’ may have been on as well. His real name is Simon Takuba. He’s a rebel leader in South Sudan.” “Why the hell didn’t you tell me? After all we’ve been through, you still don’t trust me?” “It’s his emerald eyes reflecting the harsh sun outside the awning. “Don’t believe everything you read. I was set up.” Khairi nodded. “Let me guess … Bernatto?” “How did you know?” The big man smiled, but his eyes looked tired and sad. “You do not work in Sudan for as long as I without learning how to spot a snake in the grass.” The woman returned and set down plates and silverware in front of Caine. She poured coffee from a long-necked metal pot. The aroma floated up from the cup, and Caine inhaled the scent of ginger and cinnamon. He took a sip and smiled at the woman. “Ladhid. Delicious.” She scurried back into the house. A man wearing the familiar white robes walked out carrying a wooden serving platter. Plates of steaming food covered the tray. “Speaking of snakes,” Caine said, taking another sip of the spiced coffee. “What about the information I asked for? Puff Adder … Did you find anything?” Khairi nodded. “Yes, of course. But this family has spent all morning preparing this meal for us. First we eat. Then we talk business. Mutafaq ealayh?” Caine nodded. “Agreed.” The man in the robe began setting various dishes down on the table. They began their meal by dipping wedges of warm flatbread into a bowl of ful medamas. The mash of fava beans, tomatoes and onion was garnished with herbs and a spritz of lemon. “This family had a son,” Khairi said in between mouthfuls of the delicious paste

emotional story arc

Click anywhere on the chart to see the most significant emotional words — both positive & negative — from the corresponding section of the text…
This chart visualizes the the shifting emotional balance for the arc of this story, based on the emotional strength of the words in the prose, using techniques pioneered by the UVM Computational Story Lab. To create this story arc, we divided the complete manuscript text into 50 equal-sized chunks, each with 2107.02 words, and then we scored each section by counting the number of strongly-emotional words, both positive and negative. The bars in the chart move downward whenever there’s conflict and sadness, and they move upward when conflicts are resolved, or when the characters are happy and content. The size of each bar represents the positive or negative word-count of that section.

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