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Official Secrets

  by Andrew Raymond


(about 524 pages)
130,894
total words
of all the books in our library
33.48%
vividness
of all the books in our library
8.10%
passive voice
of all the books in our library
2.64%
all adverbs
of all the books in our library
0.84%
ly-adverbs
of all the books in our library
1.80%
non-ly-adverbs
of all the books in our library

clippings from this book

We’ve analyzed hundreds of millions of words, from thousands of different authors, training our linguistic models to recognize the most vivid words in the English language… the words that create the most intense sensory experiences: colors, textures, sounds, flavors, and aromas.

Based on our analysis, we’ve scanned through the pages of this book to find the two pages at the extremes, both the most-passive and the most-vivid pages, so that you can compare them side-by-side and see the difference:

MOST PASSIVE PAGE
MOST VIVID PAGE
Abbie had sent she didn’t want anyone to be able to read it. Not even the formidable GCHQ databases. She decrypted the email using the necessary digital key and the message appeared: ‘Rebecca, I’m sending you this because you’re the only one I can trust. I’m afraid I’ve been keeping a lot of secrets from you for a long time now. Secrets I’m not proud of. It might already be too late to stop it all, but I’m going to try. Tonight could be my last chance. My life is already in danger as it is. The reason for that should become pretty clear from the files I’ve attached. The files are password-protected (you’ll figure it out), and one is encrypted: it’s too sensitive for email – I haven’t trusted our system for the last six months now. I’ve hidden a key in a README file on the laptop – which I’ve hidden under a pillow in the bedroom wardrobe here in Moreton House. Input the key and it will decrypt the last file. It’s everything you need to prove who’s guilty, and who’s innocent. You’re not going to like everything you read about me in this. I’ve been a liar – for a very long time – about any number of things as you will see. Some of it you will understand, some you won’t. Once you’ve read all the files, you will know the full truth. The files are my insurance policy. Should anything happen to me, you’ll know what to do bags had the empty boxes of burner phones bought at a newsagent; Oyster card for London underground; street maps of Westminster with handwritten notes on them; surveillance photos of Riz Rizzaq. Stella said, ‘Sid… who owns this phone?’ Vickering had turned white. He could barely get the words out. ‘It was in the house used by the Downing Street bomber cell.’ The Evidence Game Banks of the Omulev River, Poland – Tuesday, 11. 21pm ARTUR KORECKI HAD been running all evening as if his pursuers had their gun sights trained on him and might shoot at any moment. Lactic acid in his legs burned so deeply and intensely he could barely lift his feet. The wet underfoot had sapped his energy, and now he couldn’t swallow oxygen fast enough to replenish his starving muscles. He’d run over boggy marshland, through a maze-like forest – like something out of The Lord of the Rings – and crossed rivers that went as high as his chest. Now darkness had fallen he deemed it safe to finally rest, sheltering under a tall bush. His denim jacket was tattered and covered in mud from two nights sleeping rough in the countryside. His extremities ached from the cold. He didn’t even have the energy to breathe warmth into his red raw hands. The first night out, back around Lake Walpusz, a military vehicle approaching had forced Artur to take evasive action. He jumped off a cattle-crossing bridge into the freezing water thirty feet below. He had timed dipping

emotional story arc

Click anywhere on the chart to see the most significant emotional words — both positive & negative — from the corresponding section of the text…
This chart visualizes the the shifting emotional balance for the arc of this story, based on the emotional strength of the words in the prose, using techniques pioneered by the UVM Computational Story Lab. To create this story arc, we divided the complete manuscript text into 50 equal-sized chunks, each with 2617.88 words, and then we scored each section by counting the number of strongly-emotional words, both positive and negative. The bars in the chart move downward whenever there’s conflict and sadness, and they move upward when conflicts are resolved, or when the characters are happy and content. The size of each bar represents the positive or negative word-count of that section.

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